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eBook Convent Theatre in Early Modern Italy: Spiritual Fun and Learning for Women (Cambridge Studies in Italian History and Culture) download

by Elissa B. Weaver

eBook Convent Theatre in Early Modern Italy: Spiritual Fun and Learning for Women (Cambridge Studies in Italian History and Culture) download ISBN: 0521550823
Author: Elissa B. Weaver
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (April 29, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 322
ePub: 1614 kb
Fb2: 1740 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mbr docx doc azw
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: Performing Arts

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 45. 0 521 55082 3 Convent theatre in early modern Italy.

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Spiritual fun and learning for women. Got it. We value your privacy.

Cambridge Studies in Italian History and Culture). by. Elissa B. Weaver. This study shows how theater was an important feature of convent life from the early fifteenth century, probably in all of Catholic Europe and its colonies. For this study, mainly devoted to Tuscany, the author has found an extensive corpus of theatrical works of convent provenance, which argues for the widespread practice of theater in the convents. She traces its chief This study shows how theater was an important feature of convent life from the early fifteenth century,.

Recommend this journal. The Journal of Ecclesiastical History.

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.

Elissa Weaver, Convent theatre in early modern Italy: spiritual fun and learning for women (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002), 199. ^ Jenifer Haraguchi, Vita di Eleonora: A Unique Example of Autobiographical Writing in Counter-Reformation Italy, I Tatti Studies in th. . ^ Jenifer Haraguchi, Vita di Eleonora: A Unique Example of Autobiographical Writing in Counter-Reformation Italy, I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance 1. (2014): 373. ^ Haraguchi, Vita di Eleonora, 370. ^ Haraguchi, Vita di Eleonora, 369. ^ Weaver, Convent theatre, 200. ^ Weaver, Convent theatre, 202. ^ Haraguchi, Vita di Eleonora, 375.

Elissa B. Weaver, Convent Theatre in Early Modern Italy: Spiritual Fun and Learning for Women. Cambridge University Press, 2002. oceedings{Pappano2003ElissaBW, title {Elissa B. Cambridge University Press, 2002}, author {Margaret Aziza Pappano}, year {2003} }.

Convent theatre in Early Modern Italy: Spiritual fun and leaning for women. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. The wise and foolish virgins in Tuscan Convent Theatre. In Female monasticism in Early Modern Europe. An interdisciplinary view, ed. Cordula Van Whye, 125–140. Cite this chapter as: Cavallaro D. (2017) Educational Theatre for Women: From Renaissance to Fascism. In: Educational Theatre for Women in Post-World War II Italy. Palgrave Macmillan, London. First Online 16 December 2016.

Early Modern History: C 1450/1500 To C 1700. Such a detailed study of the phenomenon of exile also provides alternative perspectives on the nature and power of governments in fifteenth-century Italy, and on ideas about the legitimacy of political authority and political action. Politics & Government. 13% off. Cambridge Studies in Italian History and Culture: The Politics of Exile in Renaissance Italy. Cambridge Studies in Italian History and Culture. By (author) Christine Shaw. Format Paperback 272 pages.

Weaver, Elissa B. Convent Theatre in Early Modern Italy: Spiritual Fun and Learning for Women. Cambridge University Press. Scenes from Italian Convent Life: An Anthology of Theatrical Texts and Contexts. Harvard University Press. SARAH DUNANT is the author of the international bestsellers The Birth of Venus and In the Company of the Courtesan, which have received major acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic.

This study shows how theater was an important feature of convent life from the early fifteenth century, probably in all of Catholic Europe and its colonies. For this study, mainly devoted to Tuscany, the author has found an extensive corpus of theatrical works of convent provenance, which argues for the widespread practice of theater in the convents. She traces its chief characteristics--what the nuns' own writings tell us about their literacy and that of their audiences, and how their lives and work intersect with secular society and literary culture.