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by William M. Gaines,Howard Reich

eBook Jelly's Blues: The Life, Music, and Redemption of Jelly Roll Morton download ISBN: 0306813505
Author: William M. Gaines,Howard Reich
Publisher: Da Capo Press; 1st Printing edition (May 26, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1384 kb
Fb2: 1896 kb
Rating: 4.5
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Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: Music

Jelly's Blues recounts the tumultuous life of Jelly Roll Morton (ca . William Gaines retired from the Chicago Tribune in 2001 and is a two-time.

Jelly's Blues recounts the tumultuous life of Jelly Roll Morton (c. 18851941). A virtuoso pianist with a larger-than-life personality, he composed such influential early jazz pieces as "King Porter Stomp" and "New Orleans Blues. Howard Reich is the veteran jazz critic of the Chicago Tribune and the winner of many awards. A longtime correspondent for Downbeat magazine, he is also the author, with William Gaines, of the critically acclaimed biography Jelly's Blues: The Life, Music, and Redemption of Jelly Roll Morton. He lives in suburban Chicago. William Gaines retired from the Chicago Tribune in 2001 and is a two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting. A virtuoso pianist with a larger-than-life personality, he composed such influential early jazz pieces as "King Porter Stomp" and "New Orleans Blues

Jelly's Blues recounts the tumultuous life of Jelly Roll Morton (c. However, by the late 1930s, he was nearly forgotten.

Howard Reich, William Gaines. Jelly's Blues recounts the tumultuous life of Jelly Roll Morton (c. In 1992, the death of an eccentric memorabilia collector led to the unearthing of a startling archive, revealing Morton to be a much more complex and passionate man than many realized.

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Reich, Howard; Gaines, William. Morton, Jelly Roll, d. 1941, Jazz musicians, African American jazz musicians. Cambridge, MA : Da Capo.

The Life, Music, and Redemption of Jelly Roll Morton. by Howard Reich & William Gaines. An important, vindicatory contribution to music history, restoring Morton to the high station he deserves in American jazz. 16 pp. photos, not seen). Pub Date: May 1st, 2003. Age Range: 1885 - 1941.

Home JT Archives Jelly’s Blues: The Life, Music .

Home JT Archives Jelly’s Blues: The Life, Music and Redemption of Jelly Roll Morton by Howard Reich & William Gaines. Jelly’s Blues: The Life, Music and Redemption of Jelly Roll Morton by Howard Reich & William Gaines. Published December 1, 2003April 25, 2019 – By Duck Baker. This book presents itself along the following astonishing lines: the great pianist-composer Jelly Roll Morton, whose music fell from popularity in the early ’30s, has ever since been relegated to a position of undeserved obscurity from which this new definitive biography now purports to redeem him.

Magic Island - Meringue - Sidney Bechet, Jelly Roll Morton, Willie (The Lion) Smith. Открывайте новую музыку каждый день. Лента с персональными рекомендациями и музыкальными новинками, радио, подборки на любой вкус, удобное управление своей коллекцией. Миллионы композиций бесплатно и в хорошем качестве. Howard Reich, William M. Gaines.

You will learn about Jelly's Blues: The Life, Music, And Redemption Of Jelly Roll Morton by Howard Reich, William . Download all eBooks in PDF,ePub format for free.

You will learn about Jelly's Blues: The Life, Music, And Redemption Of Jelly Roll Morton by Howard Reich, William M. Gaines, William Gaines. Reproduction of site books is authorized only for informative purposes and strictly for personal, private use.

Jelly's Blues recounts the tumultuous life of Jelly Roll Morton (ca., 18851941). A virtuoso pianist with a larger-than-life personality, he composed such influential early jazz pieces as "King Porter Stomp" and "New Orleans Blues." However, by the late 1930s, he was nearly forgotten. In 1992, the death of an eccentric memorabilia collector led to the unearthing of a startling archive, revealing Morton to be a much more complex and passionate man than many realized. An especially immediate and visceral look into the jazz worlds of New Orleans and Chicago, Jelly's Blues is a definitive biography, a long overdue look at one of the twentieth century's most important composers.
Comments: (7)
Cheber
The great trumpeter Rafael Mendez once said that he lived by one golden rule his father taught him: "Never boast. Someone better than you may be lurking around the corner, waiting to take your place." This was a lesson that Jelly Roll Morton (1886-1941) didn't learn until bad luck, lack of opportunity and rivals who DID take his place (particularly Ellington and Art Tatum) humbled him into reassessing his talent and his place in contemporary music. But, as this remarkable book points out, he not only learned his lessons but learned from them, remaking both his image and his music in the face of near-total indifference.

When reading through this bio, I had reached about page 148 and had some reservations as to its worth over Alan Lomax's half-bio, half-autobiography, "Mister Jelly Lord." It seemed to me that the authors had bent over backward to excuse Morton's past as a pimp, gambler and hustler simply because he was the first to codify jazz in written music, and indeed even seemed to claim his superiority as a jazz musician over such luminaries as Bunk Johnson, Louis Armstrong and Sidney Bechet. Chapter Five, in particular, had several errors in both fact and judgment, consistently referring to Morton making his early acoustic recordings in front of "microphones" (they used a big metal horn to focus the sound into a steel cutting needle, no microphones were used at all, hence the term "acoustic"), renaming Bing Crosby as Bill (a typo so glaring that even a modern yuppie proofreader should have spotted it), and their astounding demotion of the New Orleans Rhythm Kings to "a rinky-dink ensemble" in their records without Morton. (In plain truth, the NORK was the first band to actually swing on records, even from their very first records in 1922, by virtue of their rolling, "loping" beat, similar in feel to that of Sidney Bechet's New Orleans Feetwarmers of a decade later. Listen and hear for yourself.)

At this point, then, I was going to give this book 3 stars, mostly for factual accuracy but not for value judgments or style. But then something happened. They began chronicling, in full detail, the meeting and eventual partnership of Morton and Roy Carew. They fully documented, as Lomax had not, all of Morton's personal, medical and legal battles with their results in his lifetime and after. They described in full Morton's second and last stay in New York, quoted what he really said to black musicians on the street corners of Harlem, and told just how he re-evaluated the musical value of contemporary musicians and planned to compete with them. And they described in detail his sad last months in California and the creative new music he had written for large orchestra, something far beyond his greatest accomplishments of the 1920s.

Morton, then, is truly given his just due as a man and musician. The loudmouthed "braggart" is revealed as a man who did not proselytize his music above all others in Harlem, but warned younger black musicians not to trust the powers that be in the music business of their time because they would get railroaded as he had. The quixotic dreamer who Lomax described as wanting to create carbon-copy Red Hot Peppers bands across America to push his name above all others is shown as a man who truly cared about finding work in the Depression for good musicians who deserved better. And the "moldy fig" whose stomps and blues were already outdated by 1939 is shown as a vital creator who was still coming up with startling new material. So much is already evident to Morton fans from a few of the 1939-40 General recordings, but this book also describes his innovative large-band scores "Mr. Joe," "Oh Baby" (not to be confused with the pop `20s song of the same name), "Why?" and especially "Ganjam." More satisfyingly for the reader, it chronicles how Morton's "loudmouthed" complaints of the early 1940s eventually led to real reform in the 1950s and `60s of the entire music business and the rules it had to follow.

As a result, I cannot recommend this book highly enough. Forget the sometimes stiff and schoolbookish writing style. Forget the occasional errors in fact and judgment. The overall picture it paints of Mr. Jelly Lord, especially in his last years, is a fine and noble one. If you think you know the Morton story, I'm here to tell you you DON'T, at least not until you read this book. I always had the utmost respect for Morton's musical mind, one of those rare organs that was able to remember with photographic precision everything it heard and synthesize it into a unique and personal style. Now I have respect for Morton the person as well, at least the Morton of his last years. Jelly Roll had indeed redeemed himself, and you WILL be startled by some of the things you read here. I guarantee it.
Alexandra
Very much of Morton's life and legacy remain in controversy, controversy in part created by Morton's own assertiveness about his seminal role in creating Jazz and the often blunt defense he made of himself against rivals like WC Handy. Reich seeks to come to Morton's defense by using recently available documents including letters from Morton to a long time collaborator and the newly-found manuscripts of Morton's compositions of the late 1930s and 1940. Along the way he presents a fairly accurate and useful picture of Morton's youth than other reporters.

Reich's strength is his depiction of Morton's last years when money ran out, his health declined, and the recording industry felt that Morton was out of fashion. He provides a great explanation of how the Melrose Brothers cheated Morton and others out of millions of royalty dollars. He also describes very well the way that ASCAP limited membership for Black composers like Handy and then provided them a pittance of the money it collected off of their compositions during the 1930s and 1940s. For those concerned about the controversies between Handy and Morton, it must be pointed out that Handy's autobiography written in 1941 ends with a paen to ASCAP, without mentioning the struggle that Morton and other Black composers had with that organization.

Morton was one of the great musicians and composers in American history. However, American capitalism's ability to milk his creativity without paying him anything reached its bleak end in his final illness. Morton could not afford decent medical attention as heart problems assailed him. He could afford only a few days in a rest home where he was told that months of such care could have lead to his survival.

One of the areas that this book provides a corrective is in relation to the Alan Lomax interviews with Jelly Roll Morton. In the mid 1930s, Morton, living in Washington spent hours being interviewed by Lomax for the library of country. Reich explains that Lomax brought a bottle of whiskey to each session and encouraged Morton to drink, knowing that Morton's comments would be come more exaggerated and pugnaciou, the more whiskey Morton drunk. This coincides with Lomax's behavior throughout his career of trying to make sources he found reflect what he wanted. Very much of Morton's reputation as an unreliable braggart comes from these interviews.
Made-with-Love
This biography corrects the widely-held impression that Jelly was a jerk. Certainly his early years were not played according to Hoyle, but he more than repaid that karmic debt with the dues that were extracted by the music industry, specifically the Melrose brothers and ASCAP. The previously written "Mr. Jelly Roll" by Alan Lomax and many disparaging remarks by the great Duke Ellington have tended to paint an ugly picture of Jelly's life and character. Learning that Lomax did not compensate Jelly for the LIbrary of Congress sessions and that the Duke was a beneficiary of Jelly's crusade against ASCAP puts quite a different spin on this great American artist.
Vishura
I've read a good bit about Morton, how he was a "braggart" and a story-teller. Indeed, he was a story-teller but once you read this book, telling how Jelly was robbed by his music publishers as well as his on again/off again wife, you'll have a greater and deeper appreciation of the artist known as Jelly Roll Morton.

A wonderful read, a sad story and thank goodness all the papers were found in that apartment/home in New Orleans less Morton end up no more or no less respected than his former reputation.

The inventor of jazz? Pretty darned close.

Now, if someone would only release the COMPLETE Lomax LOC recordings - that would be something! Mosaic, where are you when we need you?