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by Iain Ellis

eBook Brit Wits: A History of British Rock Humor download ISBN: 184150565X
Author: Iain Ellis
Publisher: Intellect Ltd (April 1, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 208
ePub: 1392 kb
Fb2: 1157 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf rtf azw lit
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: Music

For those who read Iain Ellis& first book, Rebels Wit Attitude, its follow-up, Brit Wits: A History of British Rock Humor, is a bit of a change.

For those who read Iain Ellis& first book, Rebels Wit Attitude, its follow-up, Brit Wits: A History of British Rock Humor, is a bit of a change. While that book was a bit more of a pop culture read, geared a bit more to the general public, Brit Wits requires shifting the gears of your perception. Rebels Wit Attitude dealt with humor in rock in terms of individual acts or performers (be it Chuck Berry or the Beastie Boys), whereas Brit Wits fits each act into the wider picture of British humor as a whole

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Humor, as much as any other trait, defines British cultural identity  . Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Brit Wits: A History of British Rock Humor as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Brit Wits: A History of British Rock Humor. Humor, as much as any other trait, defines British cultural identity. It is crucial in the English sense of nation, argues humor scholar Andy Medhurst; To be properly English you must have a sense of humor, opines historian Antony Easthope. Author Zadie Smith perceives British humor as a national coping mechanism, stating, You don’t have to be funny to live here, but it helps

Focusing on key subversive rock humorists, Brit Wits shows how and why humor has been such a powerful catalyst and .

Focusing on key subversive rock humorists, Brit Wits shows how and why humor has been such a powerful catalyst and expressive force in these artists’ work. Distinguishing rock humorists from rockers who are merely sometimes humorous, Iain Ellis trains his attention on those whose music and persona exude defiance-beginning with the Beatles, the Kinks, and Pink Floyd; and continuing through the Smiths, the Slits, and even the Spice Girls-to investigate the nature of rock humor and the ways in which these groups have used it to attack prevailing social structures.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Introduction: British, Rock, Humor Manifestations Across the Nation Home Is Where the Humor Is Coordinates and Determinants The Ins and Outs

Introduction: British, Rock, Humor Manifestations Across the Nation Home Is Where the Humor Is Coordinates and Determinants The Ins and Outs. 1. Starting Points Music Hall Comedy George Formby 2. The Fifties American Dreaming Lonnie Donegan 3. The Sixties Accent-uations The Beatles The Kinks Wacky Whimsy Pink Floyd Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes David Bowie, Part One 4. The Seventies Glam Bam! David Bowie, Part Two Roxy Music Goin’ down th’ Pubs Ian Dury Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s British Punk Sex Pistols The Slits Punk Poetry John Cooper Clarke The Nutty Sound Madness 5. The.

A History of British Rock Humor. Distinguishing rock humorists from rockers who are merely sometimes humorous, Iain Ellis trains his attention on those whose music and persona exude defiance – beginning with the Beatles, the Kinks and Pink Floyd; and continuing through the Smiths, the Slits and even the Spice Girls – to investigate the nature of rock humour and the ways in which these groups have used it to attack. Publisher: Intellect.

Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781841506715, 1841506710. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9781841505657, 184150565X. A History of British Rock Humor. Print ISBN: 9781841505657, 184150565X.

Humor, as much as any other trait, defines British cultural identity  . Protest has been conducted not with guns and grenades, but with biting comedy and graffiti, he observes.

Focusing on key subversive rock humorists, Brit Wits shows how and why humor has been such a powerful catalyst and . Distinguishing rock humorists from rockers who are merely sometimes humorous, Iain Ellis trains his attention on those whose music and persona exude defiance-beginning with the Beatles, the Kinks, and Pink Floyd; and continuing through the Smiths, the Slits, and even the Spice Girls-to investigate the nature of rock humor and the ways in which these groups have used it to attack.

The Sex Pistols. David Bowie. Pink Floyd. Rebel rockers and provokers of the public, vivid in our memories as much for their subversion of the mainstream as for their signature sounds. Yet what very few people realize is that a substantive part of the weaponry used by these rockers and their contemporaries was humor: outrageous onstage antics, coded cultural references, and clever lyrical constructs were all critical to expressions of youth rebellion that could still slip past the powers that be.

Focusing on key subversive rock humorists, Brit Wits shows how and why humor has been such a powerful catalyst and expressive force in these artists’ work. Distinguishing rock humorists from rockers who are merely sometimes humorous, Iain Ellis trains his attention on those whose music and persona exude defiance—beginning with the Beatles, the Kinks, and Pink Floyd; and continuing through the Smiths, the Slits, and even the Spice Girls—to investigate the nature of rock humor and the ways in which these groups have used it to attack prevailing social structures. Politics and issues of gender, class, and race are all laid open to ridicule, as is the music industry itself—epitomized by the Sex Pistols’s scathing “EMI.” And although lyrics are foregrounded, Ellis demonstrates that a guitar solo, dissident dance move, or antisocial hairstyle may in context be every bit as subversive and humorous as a song. At once an action-packed look at some of the most notorious rebels of British rock history and a celebration of an underexplored area of humor, Brit Wits compiles essays and critical profiles that look at one of the most effective—and entertaining—means of anti-establishment expression for half a century.
Comments: (3)
Anayaron
This is a good book and thoroughly impressed me. There was plenty of good information about the history of rock. I used this book for a history of rock and roll course. The book was boring in a few chapters, although for the majority of the time it kept me interested. This was a great book for my course and gave me a lot of relevant information.
JoJoshura
The author goes on and on...it was a hard read and I was nearly tempted to stop reading it, but I did finish it.
Valawye
For those who read Iain Ellis` first book, Rebels Wit Attitude, its follow-up, Brit Wits: A History of British Rock Humor, is a bit of a change. While that book was a bit more of a pop culture read, geared a bit more to the general public, Brit Wits requires shifting the gears of your perception.

Rebels Wit Attitude dealt with humor in rock in terms of individual acts or performers (be it Chuck Berry or the Beastie Boys), whereas Brit Wits fits each act into the wider picture of British humor as a whole. Music is simply the thread that connects the likes of Ricky Gervais to the likes of George Formby in the music halls.

Ellis is not looking to cover novelty acts, here. While the likes of Benny Hill or Lonnie Donegan are mentioned, it's not comedy that the author covers. It's that idea of subversive humor in rock music that's addressed here, and how that humor looks to correct those in power or simply comment on the climate in which the music is being recorded.

Would one think of nihilistic punk rockers the Sex Pistols as humorists? Not offhand, but Ellis argues that the way the group approached both playing music and appearing in public as performances demonstrative of the "caustic wit that pervaded every bone in the band's body."

It's this approach to the likes of the Smiths, Spice Girls, Happy Mondays, and what might be the first scholarly dissection of drunk-punks the Macc Ladds that allows Ellis to argue that British humor is both a coping mechanism for life in Britain and a way of "unmasking the truths of the nation." It's quite an enjoyable way to trace the course of British history, offering up an alternative view of how things occurred politically, through the eyes of those opposed to whatever might've been going on at the time.