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eBook Don't You Want Somebody to Love: Reflections on the San Francisco Sound download

by Slick

eBook Don't You Want Somebody to Love: Reflections on the San Francisco Sound download ISBN: 0943389089
Author: Slick
Publisher: SLG Books; 1st edition (1991)
Language: English
Pages: 136
ePub: 1967 kb
Fb2: 1551 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lit doc azw lrf
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: Music

San Francisco rock : the illustrated history of San Francisco rock music, by: McDonough, Jack.

Published: Berkeley, CA : SLG Books, 1991. Subjects: Rock music California San Francisco History and criticism. San Francisco rock : the illustrated history of San Francisco rock music, by: McDonough, Jack. Gimme something better : the profound, progressive, and occasionally pointless history of Bay Area punk from Dead Kennedys to Green Day, Published: (2009). So you want to be a rock & roll star, by: Lawrence, Sharon. The worst rock-and-roll records of all time : a fan's guide to the stuff you love to hate, by: Guterman, Jimmy.

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Don't you want somebody to love : reflections on the San Francisco sound : a 25th anniversary "Summer of Love" presentation. oceedings{Slick1991DontYW, title {Don't you want somebody to love : reflections on the San Francisco sound : a 25th anniversary "Summer of Love" presentation}, author {Darby Slick}, year {1991} }.

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Are you sure you want to remove Don't you want somebody to love from your list? Don't you want somebody to love. Published 1991 by SLG Books in Berkeley, CA.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Don't You Want Somebody to Love: Reflections on the San Francisco Sound as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. SF Bay Area life in the 60s may not have been all it's cracked up to be, but Darby Slick makes it sound pretty fun in his memoir about how he, brother Jerry, and sister-in-law Grace formed the Great Society and how the band eventually fell apart, with Grace leaving to join the Jefferson Airplane.

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Start by marking Don't You Want Somebody to Love . He tells the story of the evolving rock music scene in San Francisco from the perspective of someone who was part of the hippie era from the very beginning.

Start by marking Don't You Want Somebody to Love: Reflections on the San Francisco Sound as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. He also openly discusses his love for Grace Slick, who married his brother, a drummer. Slick details the development and musical growth of the Great Society, the band he and his brother and Grace formed. His description of early band gigs and Slick writes like a meandering stream, going here, going there, eventually reaching its destination.

I love this book! It is a viewpoint not often heard. There's also plenty of stuff on the music of the Great Society - how they rehearsed, how and when songs were written, and who played what, on which song.

Album: Fillmore West, San Francisco, C. When the truth is found to be lies You know the joy within you dies.

Album: Fillmore West, San Francisco, Ca. October 4th, 1970 (2018). Artist: Jefferson Airplane. Dont you want somebody to love? Dont you want somebody to love? Wouldnt you love somebody to love? You better find someone to love Find somebody to love (4x). When the dawn is rose they are dead, Yes, and youre mine, youre so full of red Your eyes, I say your eyes may look like his, Yeah, but in your head, baby, Im afraid you dont know Where it is. Tears are running, Running along down your breast And your friends, baby, They treat you likе a guest.

Darby Slick, guitarist for the Great Society and brother-in-law of Grace Slick, has written an autobiographical account of the rise of the San Francisco Sound. Don't You Want Somebody to Love is a distinctly personal perspective on those times
Comments: (4)
Ohatollia
First off, I know this book has been reviewed already, but it brought back some of the many memories from that whole era, that I felt compelled to write something to hopefully defend it from others who find it lacking. While there's nothing earth-shaking, no life-changing information, it's a pleasant, sometimes enlightening read. And that's what it's supposed to be. What some find as literary faults or shortcomings, I find charmingly innocent. To each his own. Slick doesn't pretend to be Norman Mailer (or whoever you like), he's just putting down on the page things he found (finds) interesting, and hopes maybe you will too.

Is this great literature? No. Is it supposed to be? No. It's simply one person's account of the things he saw and experienced at the very beginning of the "hippie movement", in the early 60's. And how the whole scene changed and morphed into something a bit different. And ultimately, the author's quest for learning and (again ultimately) finding himself after a long journey of discovery. The author, Darby Slick saw it all.

Darby Slick was the guitar player in THE GREAT SOCIETY (sometimes referred to as THE GREAT! SOCIETY, or THE GREAT SOCIETY!), and composer of "Somebody to Love", one of the true "60's hippie classics" of the era. In this (131 pages) book, he gives a personal account of what things were like from his perspective, from his little corner of it all.

The chapters are laid out chronologically, beginning with his childhood in Palo Alto, meeting Grace Wing-then chubby and not married to Slick's brother, Jerry, and his introduction to drugs. From that point Slick writes about his feelings for Wing (Slick), his early travels, THE BEATLES influence, and so on. He then talks about forming a band, the hippie era (which only was real and lasted for a short while in 1966 from my personal experience) when everyone knew virtually everyone else involved, and the band's first gig.

Slick also talks about bands/people then just starting to form and find some kind of identity-THE CHARLATANS (a personal favorite-check out their album), THE JEFFERSON AIRPLANE, QUICKSILVER MESSENGER SERVICE, the GRATEFUL DEAD, THE MYSTERY TREND, Janis Joplin and BIG BROTHER AND THE HOLDING COMPANY, SONS OF CHAMPLIN (their first album is great), COUNTRY JOE & THE FISH, and a few other groups and individuals.

And Slick also writes about some of the important people behind the scene-Tom Donahue (who basically started underground radio), Chet Helms (who put on dance concerts at The Avalon Ballroom), Bill Graham (who started out doing benefits for The S.F. Mime Troupe), Bill Ham (light shows), and Ralph Gleason (who excitedly wrote about this "new" music).

But after Grace Slick joined The Airplane, Darby Slick felt betrayed , and fulfilled his dream of traveling to India to study music with Ali Akbar Khan. After a few months, Slick returned to the U.S., tried to live a "normal" life, got married, sunk deeper into drugs and alcohol, became sober, and continued playing (and learning) music.

Included in this over-size soft cover book are a number of period photographs, and one of the best (and coolest) things-two b & w and four color full page reproductions of several posters advertising the band from that early period. A nice touch is a b & w photo of the author, taken in 1991, the year of the book's publication. And the cover art (which at one time you could purchase as a poster) is by the inimitable Stanley Mouse, famous for his poster work during that era. Plus (and here I'm bragging a little) my copy has bassist Jack Casady's signature from the same period when this book was published. It doesn't have any connection with the book itself (he signed it at a memorabilia show), I just think it's cool.

If you've read this far, chances are you're familiar with the band's albums-"Born To Be Burned" (Sundazed Records), and "Grace Slick & The Great Society" (both original vinyl albums on one CD from Sony/Columbia Records).

Another reason I decided to write something about this book, is that I feel that anyone with an interest in that whole period and/or the music, should have this in their library. With the many books about this era and the music (some written by people who weren't there-which removes us a step or two from that period), it's nice to sit back and read something (especially a personal account) from someone who was really there, who had close ties to it all. Would an outside editor have helped to tidy things up a bit? Possibly. But then that personal, that human touch might have disappeared from the book. Reading this book is like sitting down with Slick, and having him talk to you about those times. And that's what I like about this book. Check it out-it's a nice, small account of life during that exciting, always changing time.
Jeb
I love this book! It is a viewpoint not often heard. Darby Slick is a great writer and his first hand account of the San Francisco music scene is just great.
Mallador
What a great afternoon-and the book "Do You Want Somebody to Love;" the Reflections of the San Francisco Sound-this is what you have to read-to really put yourself into the picture. Both author Darby Slick; & artist, Stanley Mouse... "MADE" the scene here in the City. You'd see a poster by Mouse, (or compatriot) on a ubiquitous telephone pole-and stand there staring, trying your darndest to decipher the message. If you had gone in the early days to one of the shows around town-you probably would have bumped into "THE GREAT SOCIETY" which figured very prominently in our rounds. We just got left class on an afternoon like today-and were being driven by a buddy who just got a gig chauffering-in the Mecerdes, over to Darby's new place in ForestHills, they had just got back from India, the place was clean & airy. Splendid in its decor; a Tiger-Skin Rug hung on the plaster wall, there were Persian Carpets on Hardwood Floors and light colored Silk Curtains everywhere. And this was a nice place to set up the new studio with a magnificent looking Sound-System, the fancy Control Panel took up about half the room. It was a nice visit-with the local emerging music!
PanshyR
Darby Slick, guitarist for the Great Society and brother-in-law of Grace Slick, has written an autobiographical account of the rise of the San Francisco Sound. Don't You Want Somebody to Love is a distinctly personal perspective on those times -- part self-deprecating, part self-aggrandizing, it's a priceless account, written in an authentic voice by an actual participant.
Much of the text concerns Darby's views on the development of the 1960's scene in San Francisco, and on the rise of the counter-culture in the USA in general, about which he often provides thoughtful commentary. There's also plenty of stuff on the music of the Great Society -- how they rehearsed, how and when songs were written, and who played what, on which song.
There's also a great Stanley Mouse cover, a bunch of reproductions of Great Society concert posters, and a decent, if somewhat random, selection of black and white photographs.