carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Ranters Crowd Pleasers: Punk in Pop Music, 1977-92

eBook Ranters Crowd Pleasers: Punk in Pop Music, 1977-92 download

by Greil Marcus

eBook Ranters  Crowd Pleasers: Punk in Pop Music, 1977-92 download ISBN: 0385417209
Author: Greil Marcus
Publisher: Doubleday; 1st edition (April 1, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 438
ePub: 1610 kb
Fb2: 1791 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lit txt doc lrf
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: Music

Ranters & Crowd Pleasers book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Ranters & Crowd Pleasers: Punk in Pop Music, 1977-92 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Ranters & Crowd Pleasers book.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Ranters & Crowd Pleasers: Punk in Pop Music, 1977-92. Another issue is that Marcus writes about punk but never to it. In spite of his enthusiasm, he remains here a spectator, a pop anthropologist who maintains a careful, scientific distance from those he is studying. He pays attention, asks questions, takes notes, and then goes back and reports his findings to the civilized world - the readers of Rolling Stone, New West/California, Harper's, Artforum, the Village Voice - none of them likely to reach a punk audience.

By (author) Marcus Greil. AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window). Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

In the Fascist Bathroom: Punk in Pop Music, 1977-1992 Paperback. From Publishers Weekly. It's not so much that Marcus doesn't love his subject; it's more that he's so invested in having the Biggest Thinks possible about his subject that he comes crashing down in a litter of pompous distortion, at worst, and irritating self-congratulation, entirely too often. But you can do much better, as well.

Was punk just another moment in music history, a flash in time when a group of young rebels exploded in a fury of raw sound, outrageous styles, and in-your-face attitude? Greil Marcus, author of the renowned Lipstick Traces, delves into the after-life of punk as a much richer.

Was punk just another moment in music history, a flash in time when a group of young rebels exploded in a fury of raw sound, outrageous styles, and in-your-face attitude? Greil Marcus, author of the renowned Lipstick Traces, delves into the after-life of punk as a much richer phenomenon-a form of artistic and social rebellion that continually erupts into popular culture. In more than seventy short pieces written over fifteen years, he traces the uncompromising strands of punk from Johnny Rotten to Elvis Costello, Sonic Youth, even Bruce Springsteen

Greil Marcus, author of the renowned "Lipstick Traces," delves into the after-life of punk as a much richer . Marcus's unparalleled insight into present-day culture and brilliant ear for music bring punk's searing half-life into deep focus.

Greil Marcus, author of the renowned "Lipstick Traces," delves into the after-life of punk as a much richer phenomenon-a form of artistic and social rebellion that continually erupts into popular culture. In more than seventy short pieces written over fifteen years, he traces the uncompromising strands of punk from Johnny Rotten to Elvis Costello, Sonic Youth, even Bruce Springsteen. Originally published in the .

Greil Marcus (born 1945) is an American author, music journalist and cultural critic. Marcus was born in San Francisco

Greil Marcus (born 1945) is an American author, music journalist and cultural critic. He is notable for producing scholarly and literary essays that place rock music in a much broader framework of culture and politics than is customary in pop music journalism. Marcus was born in San Francisco. He earned an undergraduate degree in American Studies from the University of California, Berkeley, where he also did graduate work in political science.

2 people like this topic. It's free and anyone can join.

Was punk just another moment in music history, a flash in time when . as Ranters and Crowd Pleasers.

A retrospective of the punk revolution retraces the history of punk music, from the arrival of the Sex Pistols in 1976 through the following decade and a half. By the author of Dead Elvis. 12,500 first printing. National ad/promo. Tour.
Comments: (2)
Maldarbaq
It's not so much that Marcus doesn't love his subject; it's more that he's so invested in having the Biggest Thinks possible about his subject that he comes crashing down in a litter of pompous distortion, at worst, and irritating self-congratulation, entirely too often. As with LIPSTICK TRACES, which this was tossed together to follow, if you want to feel as if you've been intellectually challenged while reading music reviews with a modicum of pop-culture history slathered in, you could do worse. But you can do much better, as well. And you won't even have to suffer through the gosh-wow celebrations of Situationism, otherwise known as the art of overstating the obvious at tedious length.
catterpillar
Marcus succeeds in articulating in print what was so wonderful about bands like Gang of Four, the Raincoats, X-Ray Spex, the Clash, etc. There is something truly significant captured in that music between 1976-late 1980s called "punk," and the author explains it unlike no other.