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eBook No Vivaldi in the Garage: A Requiem for Classical Music in North America download

by Sheldon Morgenstern

eBook No Vivaldi in the Garage: A Requiem for Classical Music in North America download ISBN: 1555536417
Author: Sheldon Morgenstern
Publisher: Northeastern University Press; New Ed edition (July 1, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 208
ePub: 1904 kb
Fb2: 1218 kb
Rating: 4.1
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Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: Music

Morgenstern saw the classical music scene the way it was and still is AND he had the courage to tell us what he saw. No wonder many in the US are not supporting its symphony orchestras and musicians in the 21st century.

Morgenstern saw the classical music scene the way it was and still is AND he had the courage to tell us what he saw.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 179-180) and index.

Start by marking No Vivaldi in the Garage: A. .I felt like a student who would be sitting with others having drinks at a table with Mr. Morgenstern while he regaled us with his opinions on everything under the sun in the music world. Fun, but not very fulfilling

Start by marking No Vivaldi in the Garage: A Requiem for Classical Music in North America as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Fun, but not very fulfilling. And it ultimately never works as a memoir or a "requiem" or a portrait of the condition of Classical music in the US. Each chapter, however, does at least have a general "theme" around which he is able to categorize his anecdotes.

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In 2001, Morgenstern published No Vivaldi in the Garage, a book in which he recounted anecdotes from his professional experience, but .

No Vivaldi in the Garage, A Requiem for Classical Music in North America: 2001, Northeastern University Press

This autobiography by conductor Sheldon Morgenstern, founder of the Eastern Music Festival (EMF) in North Carolina, is the latest offering in a fairly steady stream of books sounding the alarm about the state of the classical music scene today.

This autobiography by conductor Sheldon Morgenstern, founder of the Eastern Music Festival (EMF) in North Carolina, is the latest offering in a fairly steady stream of books sounding the alarm about the state of the classical music scene today. It is a story of one hard-working musician's education, coming of age, and negotiation of the treacherous shoals of arts management in the second half of the 20th century.

Morgenstern scrutinizes the reasons behind the increasing mediocrity of classical music and the precarious financial state of professional symphony orchestras, many of which have already declared bankruptcy. He sharply criticizes the NEA, the Canada Council, and other arts councils and political groups for the elimination of music education in nearly all public schools

The author, a seasoned musician, orchestral conductor and music educator, appeals to readers to "do something before it's too late!" That "something" may well be reinstating music education in the American public schools. An Eye Opener for Volunteer Boards. com User, November 18, 2001.

SHELDON MORGENSTERN is Music Director Emeritus of the Eastern Music Festival, where he received two ASCAP programming awards

SHELDON MORGENSTERN is Music Director Emeritus of the Eastern Music Festival, where he received two ASCAP programming awards. He was on the conducting staff at the New England Conservatory and was Principal Guest Conductor of orchestras in Budapest, Seville, and Warsaw, as well as Interim Music Director of the Mississippi State Symphony. He continues to pursue an active conducting and teaching career, and lives in France. Shipping: US$ . 5 Within .

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read free No Vivaldi in the Garage: A Requiem for Classical Music in North America by Sheldon Morgenstern read books online free, online library, romance book read free online, historical fiction books.

In a work rich with colorful anecdotes about family, friends, and colleagues, Sheldon Morgenstern reflects on his childhood in Cleveland, Ohio, summers at the Brevard Music Festival, and years at Northwestern University. He recounts his experiences playing French horn in the Atlanta Symphony, studying conducting at the New England Conservatory, his long tenure as artistic director at the Eastern Music Festival at Guilford College in Greensboro, North Carolina, and performances as guest conductor with dozens of orchestras around the world. Morgenstern scrutinizes the reasons behind the increasing mediocrity of classical music and the precarious financial state of professional symphony orchestras, many of which have already declared bankruptcy. He sharply criticizes the NEA, the Canada Council, and other arts councils and political groups for the elimination of music education in nearly all public schools. He is also highly critical of Yo-Yo Ma, Shlomo Mintz, Daniel Barenboim, and other superstars who command extraordinary fees for sometimes second-rate performances but do little to teach young artists or to support struggling companies and festivals. He concludes by calling for strong actions that will ensure the economic survival of the arts without sacrificing excellence in performance. Filled with vivid behind-the-scenes descriptions and highlighting such well-known figures as Leonard Bernstein, Glenn Gould, Wynton Marsalis, and others, No Vivaldi in the Garage offers a refreshingly candid insider's perspective on the classical music scene.
Comments: (7)
Opimath
Sheldon Morgenstern, conductor and Director Emeritus of the venerable Eastern Music Festival, has written what purports in its preface to be a hard, comprehensive look at the deteriorating state of the arts in general and classical music in particular in North America. The book doesn't turn out quite that way--it is mostly a career memoir, interesting and colorful enough with many telling anecdotes about one musician's formative years and influences. "No Vivaldi in the Garage" works best on this level. As an indictment of the sad state of the performing arts today it offers a valid portrait, but no solutions other than the oft-stated ones of not cutting music in the public schools et al. In addition, while Morgenstern must be given credit for being willing to name names, too much personal criticism of particular figures makes his writing seem at times petty and whiny.
Xal
In reading other people's reviews, I realized that many of us read this book for different reasons. I didn't know about this book until just a few months before Shelly passed away. I was a camper at Eastern Music Festival the summers of 1967-1969. Although not the first music camp I attended, it was the one I enjoyed the most for it provided great musical development opportunities along with a social life! I loved everything about that camp and we even had unofficial reunions in Cleveland, Ohio during the school year. But what I didn't know at that time, as typical of most teenagers, was anything about the history of the camp, or very much about Shelly, himself. This was my interest in reading the book - a time when I already was reflecting on different aspects of my youth, combined with hearing of Shelly's health issues. I was so glad to read this book, and to learn so much about the backbone of the camp that really influenced me, musically. If you ever attended this camp, I don't think this book will disappoint!
hulk
Must overall agree with another reviewer that the author does not truly address what he sets out to: provide requiem for classical music in N.A. What he does provide is primarily evidence from his musical career and life as what can be called "exhibits" at best.
This is all fascinating reading, but avoids larger picture which he said he would provide, and possibly "over the top" "kissing and telling." Certainly, there are improprieties which he discloses in this highly competititve world of classical music, but airing all of this doesn't truly help his cause..
What does help is the picture barely began into at the end of lack of education at lower grade levels, and the cultural changes which are shoving classical music further and further into the background. Locally there is fight on whether instrumental music will be continued at public schools. Local FM classical station off the air, replaced by hard rock.
Seems the cultural air we breathe now is so polluted by such dominant areas which do not appreciate nor wish to see prospering classical music.
We need other cultural areas than the rich and dominating who are typically ruining local classics in most communities (as this work testifies) who need to jump in, i.e. church and education and communities. This book certainly provides some impetus for that and at the same time provides a good read of a musician's wide ranging life experiences.
Gldasiy
I for one appreciate that Sheldon Morgenstern did not create No Vivaldi as an academic treatise. The arts world has maintained the image of an exclusive club for too long, a point that Morgenstern does as much to discredit as he does the now-rapid demise of American arts in general.
No Vivaldi speaks to garage workers as well as to their symphony-going absentee landlords, and it does so with wit and grace and a justifiable amount of anger.
Using his lifetime of experience as a frame on which to build his argument, Morgenstern has given us much more than the typical boring, self-aggrandizing memoir; in No Vivaldi, he has created a most compelling read. In fact, I couldn't put it down--read it cover to cover in one sitting.
Dalallador
I loved this book because I knew Shelly very well in his early thirties. We were very good friends and I remember his tremendous passion for making classical music popular with the average person. I was very sad to hear he died. He was a very complex person.
Bolanim
I expected a book discussing the state of classical music in N. America by an insider. In fact, its more of a biographic presentation of the author's establishment of a reknowned summer training camp for young musicians. Only near the end of the book does he get into the issues of classical music's continuing slide into mediocrity. It was, nonetheless, interesting, even though there's no "red meat".
Keath
Mr. Morgenstern saw the classical music scene the way it was and still is AND he had the courage to tell us what he saw. No wonder many in the US are not supporting its symphony orchestras and musicians in the 21st century.
Fantastic