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eBook 500 Lost Gems of the Sixties download

by Kingsley Abbot

eBook 500 Lost Gems of the Sixties download ISBN: 1905959079
Author: Kingsley Abbot
Publisher: Red Planet (September 11, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 208
ePub: 1450 kb
Fb2: 1495 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lrf azw docx doc
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: Music

And most of these "lost gems" seem to tend to mainstream pop and such. Visually stimulating and although some errors exist it makes you excited about the classic period of the 45 and want to hold and play the 'Lost Gems'.

And most of these "lost gems" seem to tend to mainstream pop and such. If you're looking for information on lost 60s garage rock gems such as what you'd find on the Nuggets and Pebbles compilations, this is not your book. Still, I did find some nice stuff that I didn't know about here. No other book exists that brings the decades music alive so well and tells anyone interested in it's music what many like me found along the way but more importantly what we missed and have discovered since.

Start by marking 500 Lost Gems of the Sixties as Want to Read . The idea behind this book is simple – to gather together a fantastic selection of Sixties pop releases that are not as well-known as they deserve to be.

Start by marking 500 Lost Gems of the Sixties as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This book is perfect for those who enjoy collecting records or love the obscurer corners of pop history.

By (author) Kingsley Abbott. Free delivery worldwide. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

ISBN-13: 9781905959068, 978-1905959068. 500 Lost Gems Of The Sixties Format: Hardback. It s not just in the groove, but between the grooves that you'll find the magic

ISBN-13: 9781905959068, 978-1905959068. It s not just in the groove, but between the grooves that you'll find the magic. The idea behind this book is simple to gather together a fantastic selection of 60s pop releases that are not nearly as well-known as they deserve to be. Read full description. See details and exclusions. 500 Lost Gems of the Sixties by Kingsley Abbott (Hardback, 2008). Brand new: lowest price.

The idea behind this book is simple - to gather together a fantastic selection of Sixties pop releases that are not as well-known as they deserve to be. ISBN13:9781905959075. Release Date:September 2012.

Kingsley Abbot turns up some hidden nuggets from the golden decade. The explosion of music that happened in the 60s record industry helped make record collecting a really serious hobby. A new book by RC contributor Kingley Abbott, 500 Lost Gems Of The 60s is a glorious trawl through these rare and lesser-known goodies, written in the knowledge that it could well be perfectly possible to duplicate the book with 500 different choices; such was the awesome quality of the output of record companies in the 60s.

Caliban Below continues the story of "The Abbot's Book. A tale of horror in the classic gothic tradition, The Abbot's Book follows four generations of a noble Italian family and their response to temptation and corruption brought about by a mysterious book. You can download it now, free, on Steam! The Abbot's Book. 19 April 2018 ·. At long last we've got a new chapter coming to the world of the Abbot's Book. Look for Caliban Below on Steam this June! The Abbot's Book.

The B-side of their version of the Beatles’ Here, There and Everywhere, it sank without trace in 1966.

But now in a fascinating trawl through this vinyl graveyard, author Kingsley Abbott has unearthed 500 Lost Gems of the Sixties (Ovolo, £1. 5, published June 6), including a little gem by Episode Six. Mighty Morris Ten took the then burgeoning drag and hot rod music scene and transposed it to London’s Harrow Road. The B-side of their version of the Beatles’ Here, There and Everywhere, it sank without trace in 1966. But Ian Gillan and the song’s writer, Roger Glover, went on to find considerably more fame with Deep Purple.

Trader Horne was featured in Kingsley Abbott's book 500 Lost Gems of the 60s. To coincide with this, Stuart Maconie did a one-hour biopic radio special on Dyble's career on his BBC 6 Music programme "Freak Zone", as well as a significant piece in Record Collector. Jackie and Judy have agreed to reunite as Trader Horne for a one-off show on 29 November 2015 at Bush Hall in London to celebrate 45 years since Morning Way was first released.

The idea behind this book is simple – to gather together a fantastic selection of Sixties pop releases that are not as well-known as they deserve to be. This book is perfect for those who enjoy collecting records or love the obscurer corners of pop history.

Comments: (3)
Quellik
Upon first seeing this book, I placed a side bet with a friend: not only had I heard of every one of these 500 songs, but I probably had at least 450 on my shelf. It was only during the unpacking that I discovered that the book was written from a British perspective, and inevitably there were going to be alternate recordings, things that charted in England but not Stateside, and some discs which seemed utterly mysterious to me. Still, give Kingsley Abbott credit for impeccable taste: any man who knows two different covers of Brian Wilson’s “Guess I’m Dumb,” a small hit for Glen Campbell, is operating on a level I am bound to respect. The writing is breezily informal, the reproduced 45 labels impeccable, and the organization comprehensible. (With the 1960s, you can’t always be sure of the latter.)
Stan
I am a 60s music fanatic, and have a lot of obscure stuff that hardly anyone (outside of fanatics like me )has ever heard of. Nevertheless, there are quite a few tunes in here that were unfamiliar to me. And I am glad for that fact.

One pretty big caveat, though: This book was written from a UK perspective and for a UK audience. Occasionally this means that you will run into a song that was VERY popular in the US, but considered an obscurity in the UK (at least by this author). Songs like "You Were On My Mind" by the We Five, and "Feel A Whole Lot Better" by the Byrds, are hardly "lost gems" on this side of the pond.

The information for each song is pretty basic -- just a paragraph or two of general background information, nothing really relevatory. And most of these "lost gems" seem to tend to mainstream pop and such. If you're looking for information on lost 60s garage rock gems such as what you'd find on the Nuggets and Pebbles compilations, this is not your book.

Still, I did find some nice stuff that I didn't know about here. Page through the book while you have YouTube handy for listening to these tunes (dang, YouTube seems to have nearly *everything*), and you should find some enjoyable music.
Alsalar
This is a quite superb appreciation of vinyl...in particular the 45. Visually stimulating and although some errors exist it makes you excited about the classic period of the 45 and want to hold and play the 'Lost Gems'. No other book exists that brings the decades music alive so well and tells anyone interested in it's music what many like me found along the way but more importantly what we missed and have discovered since. And there are many in this volume that even the biggest collectors may have missed. Pity there isn't a web site so we can log on and listen to them.
An essential book for anyone who loves 60s music

Ken Charmer.....for The Four Seasons UK Appreciation Society
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