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eBook 20. Rufinus: A Commentary on the Apostles' Creed (Ancient Christian Writers) download

by J.N.D. Kelly

eBook 20. Rufinus: A Commentary on the Apostles' Creed (Ancient Christian Writers) download ISBN: 0809102579
Author: J.N.D. Kelly
Publisher: Paulist Press (January 1, 1978)
Language: English
Pages: 176
ePub: 1623 kb
Fb2: 1825 kb
Rating: 4.7
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The Apostles' Creed is one of the most ancient liturgical texts within the history of Christianity

The Apostles' Creed is one of the most ancient liturgical texts within the history of Christianity. Although its precise origins are not known - it was attributed to the Apostles in late antiquity - it likely dates to the 2nd or 3rd century. Rufinus believes the Creed itself to have been composed by the Apostles (ch. 2) and that it had survived entirely intact since their time in the Church of Rome (ch. 3). The method of explanation employed depends upon tradition, apologetics and Scriptural proof-texts.

21. St. Maximus the Confessor: The Ascetic Life, The Four Centuries on Charity (translated and annotated by Polycarp Sherwood, OSB).

XX in the series, Ancient Christian Writers.

Translated by J. N. D. Kelly. Westminster, Maryland: The Newman Press, and London: Longmans, Green and C. 1955. Vol. XX in the series, Ancient Christian Writers. Albert C. Outler (a1). Southern Methodist University.

0809102579 (ISBN13: 9780809102570). Rufinus also works within the early Christian hermeneutical tradition, giving us fascinating readings of Mary's perpetual virginity from Ezekiel 44 and a number of typological elements related to the crucifixion.

Creed (Ancient Christian Writers) (9780809102570) by . Walter J. Burghardt, SJ, a world renowned theologian, writer, and thinker, was cited in a university study as one of the 12 best preachers in the United States

Walter J. Burghardt, SJ, a world renowned theologian, writer, and thinker, was cited in a university study as one of the 12 best preachers in the United States.

The Apostles' Creed (Latin: Symbolum Apostolorum or Symbolum Apostolicum), sometimes titled the Apostolic Creed or the Symbol of the Apostles, is an early statement of Christian belief-a creed or "symbol". It is widely used by a number of Christian denominations for both liturgical and catechetical purposes, most visibly by liturgical Churches of Western tradition, including the Catholic Church, Lutheranism and Anglicanism. It is also used by Presbyterians, Moravians, Methodists and Congregationalists.

CCC 194 The Apostles' Creed is so called because it is rightly considered to be a faithful summary of the apostles' faith.

Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity entry on the Apostles' Creed. Kelly says that there is "no serious doubt" about this evidence for the origin of the received text. Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity, entry on Creeds and Confessions of Faith. CCC 194 The Apostles' Creed is so called because it is rightly considered to be a faithful summary of the apostles' faith. It is the ancient baptismal symbol of the Church of Rome.

The Apostle’s creed - what is it and why is it called that? .

Where do southern Baptist stand on the use of the apostles creed? Or for the use of any creed other than our core doctrine.

In it, he recounted the viewpoint that the apostles wrote the creed together after Pentecost, before leaving Jerusalem to preach (Symb. See what about the Christian faith is so counter-cultural and what truths embedded in the Apostles’ Creed we’ve come to assume-when really they should amaze us. Get more from your Bible study. Where do southern Baptist stand on the use of the apostles creed? Or for the use of any creed other than our core doctrine. December 28, 2016 at 8:13 am.

His most important work, aimed at persons under instruction for the sacraments, the Commentary offers a guide to elucidating and justifying the Creed. It offers a glimpse of popular Christian propaganda at the beginning of the fifth century.
Comments: (2)
Froststalker
The Apostles' Creed is one of the most ancient liturgical texts within the history of Christianity. Although its precise origins are not known - it was attributed to the Apostles in late antiquity - it likely dates to the 2nd or 3rd century. It appears that there were several variants of the Apostles' Creed; this particular commentary dates from around 404 CE, and works off of the Roman version. This latter point is particularly important, for whereas the Apostles' Creed has since been standardized, in the early 5th century there were still some minor variations on this Creed. Rufinus' own theological exposition comes straight out of the very language of the Roman version - although he notes differences between the Roman version and that held by the Greeks (ie, the Eastern Church, which would later call itself the Orthodox Church).

For Rufinus, there are three articles in the Creed - the first pertaining to the Father, the second to the Son and the third to the Holy Spirit - each of which consists of multiple clauses. The Commentary is an exposition of each article and the clauses contained within it. Rufinus believes the Creed itself to have been composed by the Apostles (ch. 2) and that it had survived entirely intact since their time in the Church of Rome (ch. 3). The method of explanation employed depends upon tradition, apologetics and Scriptural proof-texts.

It should be noted that in accord with early Christian methods of interpretation, Rufinus does not reduce the Biblical text to its "plain sense"; in Old Testament writings he sees prophecies pertaining to eh Christian message, in some of St. Paul's more ambiguous statements he sees references to the Cross of Christ. What we are given, then, at points, is a reading of historical events through Scripture where both are presupposed to be filled with symbolic meaning. Specifically, St. Paul's words pertaining to "the height and the depth and the breadth" is understood by Rufinus to pertain to the Cross: "The portion of [the cross] which was fixed in the earth was the depth. By height he meant the part which stretches above the earth and towers upwards, by breadth the parts which extend outwards to the right hand and to the left" (ch. 14). The cross as a historical event takes on cosmic significance through a symbolic interpretation grounded in Scripture. Although some readers might find such interpretation to be imaginative - at best, ridiculous at worst - such a way of "reading" history and Scripture and, indeed, the various objects in the world ought to be taken seriously, for it was the worldview of the early Christians - one which many lived and died for. Within this framework, the very material elements of salvation history are given the greatest spiritual significance. It's a view well worth thinking about.

J. N. D. Kelley's introduction is nothing short of phenomenal. Not only does he include the Roman version of the Apostles' Creed, but the Aquilean version as well, noting the differences between the two and the ways in which the history of transmission and reception played itself out in the early Church. He notes, as well, how Rufinus' view of the Biblical canon seems to have largely depended upon that given by the Greek Father St. Athanasius the Great - although Athanasius included some books that Rufinus exluded, and Rufinus included some books that Athanasius included. They both, however, included the same three additional books - The Shepherd of Hermas, The Two Ways (which is likely the same as the Didache), and The Judgment of Peter (which is now lost) - in the New Testament under the section "Ecclesiastical Books" (that is, books accepted as helpful for instruction, but not for the composition of doctrine - a category that Anglicans, for instance, would apply to what those books now called the Apocryphal or Deuterocanonical books of the Old Testament). The history of the canonization of the Biblical books is absolutely fascinating, and Rufinus provides some very interesting information on this matter.

This is a wonderful book. At its most basic level it is a fine work of catechesis (teaching) - which Rufinus intended it to be. The major themes of the Trinity and supporting themes such as the Church, the forgiveness of sins and the resurrection of the dead are all touched upon in a clear and concise manner. As a historical work, it also contains much of interest; it is not just the devil that is in the details, but worldviews as well - and coming into contact with these worldviews will open up the reader's eyes to both the past and the present. Reading it both as a catechetical and a historical work will put the reader in touch with something of the height, breadth and depth of the Church's tradition - something that Rufinus no doubt would have been also pleased with. Although I trust that Rufinus would have held that this has to do with subject matter and not his own skill, I think it is probably a little bit of both. This book is highly recommended.
AfinaS
This is a most excellent resource on the formation of the creed. I recommend it highly. It is a worthwhile read.