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eBook Rock of Ages: The Rolling Stone History of Rock and Roll download

by Geoffrey Stokes,Ken Tucker,Ed Ward

eBook Rock of Ages: The Rolling Stone History of Rock and Roll download ISBN: 0671630687
Author: Geoffrey Stokes,Ken Tucker,Ed Ward
Publisher: Simon & Schuster (November 1, 1986)
Language: English
Pages: 649
ePub: 1706 kb
Fb2: 1142 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mbr lrf docx mobi
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: Music

Rolling Stone has commissioned a new full-scale history by three rock experts.

Rolling Stone has commissioned a new full-scale history by three rock experts. Ward covers the Fifties, Geoffrey Stokes the Sixties, Ken Tucker the Seventies and Eighties. Each provides a finely detailed chronicle of the major and minor figuresmusicians, company executives, disc jockeys, and promoters. No new historical interpretation is offered. According to Ed Ward in the first 1/3 of "Rock of Ages," country and rhythm & blues evolved along parallel lines until coming together and producing the country/r&b offspring called rock and roll. Yes, this would certainly explain the vast similaries between Grandpa Jones and Muddy Waters.

Ken Tucker traces the 1970s through roughly 1985, tracking funk, disco, punk and new wave and the further splintering of the audience into niche markets. A must have member of the Rolling Stone Magazine trilogy of rock (The 1983 Encyclopedia & the red-cover [the blue's good too)record guide being the others). Apr 29, 2008 Peter rated it really liked it. Shelves: rock-and-roll, music. Got this book when I was still in my teens.

"Robert Christgau: Consumer Guide Oct. 3, 1977".

Ward, Ed, 1948-; Stokes, Geoffrey, 1940-; Tucker, Ken, 1953 . New York : Rolling Stone Press : Summit Books : Distributed by Simon & Schuster. Attempts to track rock and roll-as music, as culture, as headline maker, as business-from its hazy origins to the present day.

Ward, Ed, 1948-; Stokes, Geoffrey, 1940-; Tucker, Ken, 1953-. inlibrary; printdisabled; ymusic; audio music. Introduction - The fifties and before - The sixties - The seventies and beyond.

by Ken Tucker, Geoffrey Stokes, Ed Ward. I think for many readers this will be less a cliche than a revelation after all it does have "Rolling Stone" in the title, and was doubtless not aimed at music academia. Me thinks he protest too much

Publisher: PENGUIN BOOKS LTD, 1987.

Publisher: PENGUIN BOOKS LTD, 1987.

Ken Tucker, Geoffrey Stokes, Ed Ward. Place of Publication. The History of Rock Weekly Magazines. Paperback Ken Follet Books. History of Rock Illustrated Magazines. This item doesn't belong on this page.

ROCK OF AGES: The Rolling Stone History of Rock and Roll. By Ed Ward, Geoffrey Stokes and Ken Tucker

ROCK OF AGES: The Rolling Stone History of Rock and Roll. By Ed Ward, Geoffrey Stokes and Ken Tucker. Rolling Stone Press/Summit Books. Rock-and-roll has traditionally found room for the idealism of youth, the calculating crassness of commerce, and the development of a uniquely American musical and verbal idiom. Why has this widely misunderstood music, consistently under attack from secular and religious authorities, taken root so stubbornly? To what degree is it subculture, to what degree mass culture?

Most "history" books about Rock and Roll are little more than tabloid trash, unsubstantiated gossip or silly rants . The Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock and Roll: The Definitive History of the Most Important Artists and Their Music - hands down.

Most "history" books about Rock and Roll are little more than tabloid trash, unsubstantiated gossip or silly rants about how wonderful it was when the writer discovered the Beatles or Led Zeppelin. The best books about Rock and Roll are reference works that teach you about the records themselves and allow you to listen to them (the only real way to learn about the music) with a more intelligent ear. I love any books by Robert Christgau, particularly his Consumer Record Guides of the 70's, 80's and 90's. I also like the All Music guides.

Miller, Jim, ed. The Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock & Roll, 1st E. New York: Rolling Stone Press, 1976. ISBN 978-0-312-33059-0. Tucker, Ken; Stokes, Geoffrey; Ward, Ed. Rock of Ages: The Rolling Stone History of Rock & Roll, New York: Summit, 1986. Country: The Music and the Musicians, New York: Abbeville Press, 1988. Kissing Bill O'Reilly, Roasting Miss Piggy – 100 Things To Love and Hate About TV, New York City, New York: St. Martin's Press, 2005.

Chronicles the history of rock and roll from its beginnings to the present day, describing how the music evolved and changed society
Comments: (4)
Lanin
I have to admit I found this a tough read at times. It jumps around alot from subjuct to subject; trying to tie everything together in one ,neat, continues bundle. An the age of the book (1986) leaves much out from what I would be interested in music wise; but on the whole I did have fun reading it and much of the info is very interesting and indepth. The future of "rock" from a 86' perspective is odd along with the view of Michael Jackson, but this book is one that I kept coming back too to read and eventually finish.
net rider
If you're like me, you've always been mystified by the uncanny similarity between Hank Williams and John Lee Hooker, to say nothing of the near-identical vocal qualities of Hank Snow and B.B. King. Luckily, we have a book that explains it all. According to Ed Ward in the first 1/3 of "Rock of Ages," country and rhythm & blues evolved along parallel lines until coming together and producing the country/r&b offspring called rock and roll. Yes, this would certainly explain the vast similaries between Grandpa Jones and Muddy Waters. According to Ward, "the hillbillies were getting radical (musically)" in the early 1950s--hillbillies like Flatt and Scruggs, "Little" Jimmy Dickens, Lefty Frizzel, and Tennessee Ernie Ford. Certainly, when one listen's to Frizzel's "If You've Got the Money I've Got the Time," one can hear a musical revolution in the works. Radical, radical stuff.
As a warm-up to listing such maverick selections as T. Ernie Ford's "Shotgun Boogie," Ward provides scholarly and valuable historical background, including a one-sentence account of the origin of jazz: "In 1902 or thereabouts, someone improvised a countermelody against the one the rest of the band was playing, and the seed of an all-new indigenous American music, jazz, was planted." I frankly prefer this account to the more complicated and stuffy one contained in the 1926 pop song "Birth of the Blues," which features lyrics about new notes pushed through a horn 'til they're born into blue notes, or something like that. That may be more academically correct than Ward's account, but I'd rather be entertained as I learn. And Ward brilliantly sums up the big band era by noting the era's three types of orchestras--"sweet, corn, and swing." By the time rock and roll is born (starting on page 98 with the helpfully-titled chapter, "Rock and Roll Is Born"), we have finished the Ed Ward Roots of Rock Home Study Course, and are ready to digest all of the usual cliches about how rock and roll died (temporarily) in the late 1950s, how Tin Pan Alley took over rock and roll songwriting, etc., and suddenly we're in the 1960s.
Enter Geoffrey Stokes, who tells us all about how "rock" replaced "rock and roll" in 1963, a full 61 years after jazz was invented. (But what happened to "and roll"?)
And so it continues. There are certainly smaller volumes of crank musicology out there, but "Rock of Ages" is probably the most comprehensive collection of pop music mythology to be found anywhere. The authors don't leave a single music-journalistic cliche unturned, and some of the names and titles dropped herein are more than worth checking out. But if you are looking for serious rock musicology, hide thyself from this.
Kale
A tour de force of monumental proportions, Geoffrey Stokes has really turned an entire generation of music into a concise yet informative book that truly stimulates the intellect of even the faintest fan of American rock & roll. Clever anecdotes reveal each musician's voice behind timeless classics of the modern era. A must have for all; this book can easily complete a collection or start it. I recommend it with ALL of my critical expertise.
lucky kitten
Wasn't what I expected