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eBook Randy Newman's American Dreams download

by Kevin Courrier

eBook Randy Newman's American Dreams download ISBN: 1550226908
Author: Kevin Courrier
Publisher: ECW Press; 1st edition (June 20, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 348
ePub: 1195 kb
Fb2: 1154 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: rtf mobi azw docx
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: Music

Kevin Courrier also doesn't think Newman's film music is very good. I strongly disagree Randy Newman is a real craftsman. The writer makes the mistake of comparing Newman's songs with the functional purpose of music for the movies.

Kevin Courrier also doesn't think Newman's film music is very good. I did like to read about the friendship between Newman and Lenny Waronkel. But the extraordinary Newman family, with the great film-composers Alfred, Lionel and nephew Thomas Newman don't get enough attention

Among his peers, Randy Newman is considered one of the most respected singer-songwriters in contemporary .

Among his peers, Randy Newman is considered one of the most respected singer-songwriters in contemporary American music. For over 40 years, he has composed a variety of hits for artists as diverse as Judy Collins, Three Dog Night, and Tom Jones.

Randy Newman's American Dreams book.

Randall Stuart Newman (born November 28, 1943) is an American singer-songwriter, arranger, composer and pianist who is known for his distinctive voice, mordant (and often satirical) pop songs and film scores. Since the 1980s, Newman has worked mostly as a film composer. His film scores include Ragtime, Awakenings, The Natural, Leatherheads, Pleasantville, Marriage Story, Meet the Parents, Cold Turkey and Seabiscuit

In this book, Randy Newman's American Dreams, author Kevin Courrier goes "under-cover" to discover who the "real" Randy Newman is and what his songs reveal about himself and his country.

In this book, Randy Newman's American Dreams, author Kevin Courrier goes "under-cover" to discover who the "real" Randy Newman is and what his songs reveal about himself and his country. The book is thick with information about popular music not only about Newman but about Frank Sinatra, Jackie De Shannon and Harry Nilsson. It is a triumph of musical biography laced with good stories about singers, record labels and Newman himself.

Book Description In addition to covering the life, music, and philosophy of Randy Newman, an enigmatic and audacious American composer, this biography looks at why he has been so largely unacknowledged-and misunderstood-by listeners and fans alike.

He is the author of five published books including Dangerous Kitchen: The Subversive World of Zappa (2002) and Randy Newman's American Dreams (2005), 33 1/3 Captain Beefheart's Trout Mask Replica (2007) and Artificial Paradise: The Dark Side of The Beatles' Utopian Dream (2008). He is currently working on a new book entitled, Reflections in the Hall of Mirrors: American Movies and the Politics of Idealism.

Randy Newman's American dreams. There's no description for this book yet. Randy Newman's American dreams. Published 2005 by ECW Press in Toronto.

This doesn’t mean their great achievement is the way they articulate and chronicle the moments in which they were made, though both do that exceptionally. Rather, history defines itself when the past so blatantly burns within the particulars of the present, and that’s what Good Old Boys and The Dirty South convey.

Randall Stuart Newman (born November 28, 1943) is an American singer-songwriter, arranger, composer, and pianist who is known for his distinctive voice, mordant (and often satirical) pop songs, and for film scores. His film scores include Ragtime, Awakenings, The Natural, Leatherheads, Cats Don't Dance, Meet the Parents, Cold Turkey, and Seabiscuit

Among his peers, Randy Newman is considered one of the most respected singer-songwriters in contemporary American music. For over 40 years, he has composed a variety of hits for artists as diverse as Judy Collins, Three Dog Night, and Tom Jones. In 1997, Newman caused controversy with the chart-topping “Short People,” wrote the stage musical Faust, and became a successful composer for such acclaimed films as The Natural, Avalon, Toy Story, and Monsters Inc. Yet, despite his vast body of work, Newman is still far from being a household name.This book examines why this enigmatic, audacious composer has been so largely unacknowledged — and misunderstood — by listeners and fans alike. With detailed precision, Courrier delves into the reasons for Newman’s peripheral status on the cultural landscape, suggesting that, at heart, he has always been a musical outsider and built a career in the mainstream by donning a brilliant disguise. This is an illuminating portrait of the artist as a masked man — an Artful Dodger taking readers on an equivocal voyage up through the streams and tributaries of a vast and sometimes tragically complex American domain.

Comments: (7)
Silver Globol
It would not be accurate to say this book is totally worthless. It does contain a few facts about Randy Newman that I didn't pick up from the liner notes.

At the same time, as the other reviewers noted, the author is unbelievably arrogant and opinionated. As one example, you may be surprised to learn that the scores for Awakenings, The Natural, and Ragtime are bland and unimaginative. I guess I am misguided, because I thought they were great.

This book also contains the most shameless examples of page filling I've ever seen. Almost every subject is a springboard for a few pages of details that have nothing to do with Newman. Indeed, it's not clear that the author has even met Randy Newman.

Like most people who are reading this page, I think Randy Newman is great. He deserves a serious study. This isn't it.
Sadaron above the Gods
As so many Randy Newman fans I was very much looking forward to this book. But I am sorry to say I do not like this book at all. The writer is to analytical and opinionated.

What also bothered me was that he goes on and on about other artists (Bob Dylan, Dusty Springfield, Brian Wilson etc.), sometimes for three or four pages, where two sentences would have been enough.

Kevin Courrier also doesn't think Newman's film music is very good. I strongly disagree Randy Newman is a real craftsman. The writer makes the mistake of comparing Newman's songs with the functional purpose of music for the movies.

I did like to read about the friendship between Newman and Lenny Waronkel. But the extraordinary Newman family, with the great film-composers Alfred, Lionel and nephew Thomas Newman don't get enough attention. Instead Kevin Courrier attempts to psychoanalyse; "Life behind the mask", "the success of the mask" etc. trying to explain why Newman does what he does - to me that is not very interesting and I think it's pretentious.

All in all this book has been a disappointment. A unique composer & songwriter like Randy Newman with whom every note, chord and sentence has a meaning certainly deserves a lot better than this!
Ynonno
Like one of the other reviewers of this book, I was more glad of its actual existence than bothered by any of its flaws. Those flaws are as otherwise described; namely a tendency on the author's part both to focus on other, not always relevant, artists, and to assume that his own interpretation of the meaning of any given Newman song is necessarily the "correct" one. The former is frequently not a flaw at all - I was perfectly happy, for example, with the number of pages devoted to Harry Nilsson, partly because Nilsson was another exceptional artist, and partly because he was relevant to the book. But 3 pages about a Procul Harum song based on "The Beehive State" was something I skimmed past.

This is mainly a matter of personal preference, which is my main problem with Courrier's book. Consider, for example, Courrier's interpretation of "My Life Is Good". This, he says, is "a savage attack on yuppie values". Really? I'd always enjoyed the idea that it was Newman actually admitting, or even celebrating, his own indifference or selfishness, or at least suggesting that such traits are worth consideration beyond mere condemnation. The Randy Newman whose songs I enjoy is someone who explicitly does not tell you what to think. The author of "Rednecks", "Sail Away", "Political Science" etc is, to me, someone whose keynote is ambiguity, and the deliberate portrayal of supposedly unpalatable sentiments in a sympathetic light.

Similarly, the track "Masterman and Baby J", about which Newman said, "I wanted to write about rap bragging. It's amazing how much of it there is", becomes, according to Courrier, an attempt to "dramatize how the despair and disenfranchisement of black urban poetry has led to an incendiary and poetic form of musical expression". No evidence is presented for this assertion, and it's perfectly possible to believe (as I do) that Newman simply doesn't like rap bragging.

Courrier is, however, savvy enough to recognise and appreciate the complexity and importance of "Good Old Boys", namely that it represents Newman's giving the working class Deep South a decent hearing on its own terms, and that the opening track "Rednecks" was a satire that chose to avoid the easy target its title implied, and instead to lampoon the complacency of Northern liberals, and their own attitudes towards the Southern States. He's also good on details; I didn't know that the edition of the Dick Cavett show that spawned "Rednecks" had Gore Vidal as a guest. Merely learning this gives you a clue as to why the song was written. Also, he's clearly a fan, and this is ultimately why the book's values outweigh its flaws. It makes you want to listen to Randy Newman; in particular the pages about his first album (which I've often overlooked in favour of "Sail Away" and "Good Old Boys") had me listening to it again and recognising further virtues. The title track of "Sail Away" warrants several pages in its own right, which are again educational as well as interesting - you learn that Gladys Knight, of all people, recorded a cover of the song.

Ultimately, then, you might disagree (or not) with how some of the songs' "messages" are interpreted - I tend to see Newman as a kind of musical Larry David, fairly at home with the flaws he describes, rather than as a political figure whose job is to condemn and criticise - but this is at least a serious study of a significant artist, and well worth the reading.
Leniga
Music is one of the most difficult art forms to write about clearly and fairly. Sometimes it's not enough just to listen to every recording in an artist's career. The insights may be hidden or disguised by the artist so that they don't reveal anything about themselves. So it is with Randy Newman, one of the best contemporary songwriters and musicians to come from the United States. In this book, Randy Newman's American Dreams, author Kevin Courrier goes "under-cover" to discover who the "real" Randy Newman is and what his songs reveal about himself and his country. To this end, Courrier has written a well researched treatise on Newman's music and his times. The book is thick with information about popular music not only about Newman but about Frank Sinatra, Jackie De Shannon and Harry Nilsson. It is a triumph of musical biography laced with good stories about singers, record labels and Newman himself. I highly recommend this to anyone interested in taking the time to learn about one musician's art and how he's been treated by the music business.
Raniconne
What a truly awful book, masquerading as a biography it is more a commercial for some other book written by the author. I'm sure Courrier thought he was illuminating the work of Randy Newman for the masses, but this appalling effort is an overwrought theme clabbered with Freshman English opinion. Too bad the author wasn't as interested in Mr. Newman and his work as he was about his assumptions concerning what it might mean to him. Poor structure, wandering voice, nothing to recommend this work. Randy Newman is an artist that deserves a descent examination.