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eBook Godard: A Portrait of the Artist at Seventy download

by Colin Maccabe

eBook Godard: A Portrait of the Artist at Seventy download ISBN: 0747577943
Author: Colin Maccabe
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (July 5, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 448
ePub: 1766 kb
Fb2: 1196 kb
Rating: 4.3
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Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: Individual Artists

Colin MacCabe is a British academic, writer and film producer. He has published books on a variety of subjects, including Jean Luc Godard, James Joyce and .

Oct 23, 2017 Jonfaith rated it it was amazing. Colin MacCabe is a British academic, writer and film producer. Eliot, and has produced many films, among them Young Soul Rebels, Seasons in Quincy, and Caravaggio. He is currently distinguished professor of English and film at the University of Pittsburgh.

This is, at last, the book Godard deserves, one that does justice to the life and work of the most original filmmaker of the twentieth century

This is, at last, the book Godard deserves, one that does justice to the life and work of the most original filmmaker of the twentieth century. MacCabe vividly recreates the social and political turmoil of post-war France in which Godard came of age, moves fluidly from the theoretical to the personal, and captures at once the essence of the Nouvelle Vague and the particularity of individual films. A remarkable achievement. Peter Biskind, author of Easy Riders, Raging Bulls.

MacCabe succeeded Peter Sainsbury as Head of the BFI Production Board, a funding agency that had developed to include the progressive amalgamation of avant garde . Godard: A Portrait of the Artist at Seventy (2003).

MacCabe succeeded Peter Sainsbury as Head of the BFI Production Board, a funding agency that had developed to include the progressive amalgamation of avant garde, oppositional and art cinema; and supported the work of a wide range of filmmakers including Isaac Julien, Derek Jarman, Terence Davies and Gurinder Chada.

Colin MacCabe is Distinguished Professor of English and Film at the University of Pittsburgh; teaches at the University of Essex; and serves as the Chairman of the London Consortium, of which he was a founder.

with James Joyce, to whom Colin MacCabe compares him. Godard may or may not be "the great French poet of the . Godard may or may not be "the great French poet of the 20th century", as MacCabe at one point proposes. What he is for sure is a sui generis act, too prolific and protean to encapsulate in a single work. Working from the conviction that little in Godard's life makes sense outside its context, MacCabe fills us in on Swiss Protestantism, the legacies of Brecht, the vagaries of the postwar left in France.

Godard," MacCabe writes, "broke all the rules

These were some of the innovations that inspired filmmakers from London to Hollywood - even, or perhaps especially, in television commercials, which in turn affected features, much the way music videos would in the last decades of the 20th century. Godard," MacCabe writes, "broke all the rules.

Colin MacCabe teaches at the Universities of Pittsburgh and Exeter, and works as a producer for Minerva Pictures. His most recent book is The Eloquence of the Vulgar. He worked with Godard in the '70s and '80s. Bibliographic information. Godard: A Portrait of the Artist at Seventy.

For Colin MacCabe, Jean-Luc Godard is one of these protean figures. His films are, he asserts, "amongst the most important European art of the second half of the twentieth century," and he sees the director's career as a walking metaphor for "the paradoxes of modernism at their most acute. This means that his book is more than just a biography

Godard: A Portrait of the Artist at Seventy (Paperback). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Godard: A Portrait of the Artist at Seventy (Paperback). Colin MacCabe (author).

Perpetual Carnival (2017). Remembering Chris Marker (2017). Godard: A Portrait of the Artist at Seventy (2004) UK US. The Butcher Boy (2007) UK US. . Godard’s Contempt (2012) ed. with Laura Mulvey UK US. Empire and Film (2011) ed. with Lee Grieveson UK US.

Jean-Luc Godard's early films revolutionised the language of cinema for everyone, from the "Superbrats of Hollywood" to the political cinema of the Third World. Yet in 1968, he abandoned one of the most brilliant careers in French cinema to pursue his investigations into sound and image on the periphery of the industry he had rejected. Following a protected childhood in Switzerland in the Second World War, the post-war years saw Godard as a troubled adolescent in Paris, where the prescribed courses of the Sorbonne were ignored in favour of the extraordinary teaching of Andre Bazin, the greatest of film critics. In the pages of "Cahiers du Cinema", Godard - together with Truffaut, Rohmer, Rivette and Chabrol - hammered out an aesthetic that would take the world by storm as the young critics swapped pens for cameras at the end of the 1950s to create the cinema of the nouvelle vague. Hugely prolific in his first 10 years - "A Bout de Souffle", "Le Petit Soldat", "Le Mepris," "Pierrot Le Fou", "Alphaville", "Made in USA" and many others all appeared in the 1960s - Godard became and remains one of the most adventurous and enigmatic film-directors at work in the world today.
Comments: (4)
Dibei
I'm taking a class on Godard. This is the required reading. (We have weekly articles but this book supplements those readings.) It's a very nice read. MacCabe kind of goes on tangents that don't relate to Godard sometimes, but overall it's a good book. (Still currently reading it.)
Usanner
Once upon a time, Godard was the leading filmmaker in the world, and if he lost some of his stature after a run of didactic, neo-Rossellini and Maoist tracts in the 1970s, he never really wanted to be famous, just influential. MacCabe, who has written interesting books on Warhol and Nicolas Roeg, explicates the progression of a great artist from enfant terrible to a man most think has died. The chapter about Anna Karina is wonderful, and we get the impression that Karina remains for MacCabe one of the icons of femininity, whereas he is cool and respectful towards Anne-Marie (Godard's frequent collaborator) you get the feeling he's not turned on by her the way he is by Karina. Also, we see him being tremendously gallant I think, towards Jane Fonda, with whom Godard made a film TOUT VA BIEN and then after it failed, he turned on her with the vicious "cinema portrait" LETTER TO JANE, castigatig her for her vanity and her foolish liberalism. MacCabe delivers a reproof to Godard and Gorin that says it all.

I do agree that Godard has made too many films for any one critic to account for. It is not MacCabe's fault exactly, but he might have written two books, one on Godard's international career as auteur in the 1960s, and the other of the virtually unknown films. He makes you want to see them on the one hand, but on the other hand one realizes with a sinking heart, well, life's too short!
Steelrunner
The author of this book writes aptly about the cultural and political contexts that frame the life of its protagonist and particularly well about Godard's experiences on or around May 1968. MacCabe shows himself as almost totally sympathetic (yet not completely uncritical) to a relatively unpleasant subject. Perhaps, Godard is too private for compassionate emanations, perhaps the priveleged scope of this work stretched only to the opus of the film maker and not beyond, but there seems to be very little evidence of the delightful emotions that mark most lives in the life of this subject. Will the brilliance of the films outshine the unkind specter of the living artist? MacCabe writes very well on the evolution of Godard's techniques and fascinations. Godard works autonomously, vigorously and in daring fashion from the beginning. There is no doubt that Godard is an innovator and a believer in his style and visions.
It's just that the creator of the films doesn't seem to be the sort of person who endures either the scrutiny of a biographer or the acquaintance of people who are not cinematic savants well at all. That surprise though is hardly grounds for the criticism of the book or its subject by one who stands wholly uninjured by both.
Zymbl
For anyone who is only marginally curious about the vacillating fortunes of Jean-Luc Godard, which has dimmed to virtual darkness since the 1960s, Colin MacCabe's book Godard: A Portrait of the Artist at Seventy contains very little that is useful and a great deal that is both confusing and misleading. MacCabe is blessed with intimate knowledge both personally and professionally of Godard, and doesn't hesitate to demonstrate this. What he fails to demonstrate to this non-convert to Godard is precisely anything that might sway me from the conviction, cultivated over 30 years, that - at best - Godard was politically stupid, technically puerile and artistically bankrupt from beginning to end - an end which MacCabe is anxious to prove is as much the end of European culture as Dante's Divine Comedy was its beginning (he even cavils that this "is no exaggeration.").
Such admiration as this would be charming if it were to any degree justified. A little objective discrimination, presuming Mr MacCabe still believes in such things, would've been far more welcome. This book, however, is founded on the premise that Jean-Luc Godard (a co-founder of the French New Wave) is a film artist of unprecedented importance. That this premise is sheer flapdoodle tends to deflate most of the points Mr MacCabe attempts to make about Godard, or Film, or European culture for that matter.