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eBook Painted Prints: The Revelation of Color in Northern Renaissance and Baroque Engravings, Etchings, and Woodcuts download

by Susan Dackerman

eBook Painted Prints: The Revelation of Color in Northern Renaissance and Baroque Engravings, Etchings, and Woodcuts download ISBN: 0271022345
Author: Susan Dackerman
Publisher: Penn State University Press; 2nd Edition edition (October 11, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 312
ePub: 1782 kb
Fb2: 1103 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mbr docx lrf doc
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: History and Criticism

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This catalog accompanies an intriguing exhibit of painted Northern Renaissance and Baroque prints mounted by the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) and then moving to St. Louis.

3. The Technology and Materials of Renaissance and Baroque Hand-Colored Prints. The number of woodcuts colored in this manner demonstrates that the appearance of the color itself was valued over the meticulousness of its application. Early on, religious institutions produced woodcuts and metalcuts for sale as devotional images, pilgrimage and saint’s-day souvenirs, and talismans against -illness. By the third quarter of the fifteenth century, professional printmakers’ workshops replaced monasteries as the principal site of print production.

According to Susan Dackerman, curator of prints, drawings and . Coloring a print was thus seen as an integral element augmenting the print’s expressive power, beauty, and meaning in the Renaissance and Baroque.

According to Susan Dackerman, curator of prints, drawings and photographs at the Baltimore Museum of Art and curator of the exhibition: "The 16th and 17th-century visual experience was filled with the colors of stained-glass windows, tapestries, frescoes, illuminated manuscripts, and oil paints. The works in the exhibition range from early devotional woodcuts to botanical and zoological prints and large wall decorations.

This unassumingly titled book is a revelation. It is the first, and probably definitive, survey of Jesuit painting in Rome before the Baroque. While the Jesuit hand in seventeenth-century Roman art and architecture has been long appreciated and extensively studied, Bailey warns us that 'nothing in the history of Italian painting may be as detested as the religious painting of the last four. decades of the 1500s'.

book by Susan Dackerman

Additionally, Northern Renaissance artists also applied this newfound appreciation for realism to portraiture, as evident in Jan van Eyck’s well-known piece, The Arnolfini Portrait

Additionally, Northern Renaissance artists also applied this newfound appreciation for realism to portraiture, as evident in Jan van Eyck’s well-known piece, The Arnolfini Portrait. In addition to its secular subjects, this painting is celebrated for its dimensionality, tonal achievement, and meticulous detail-which each adds an aspect of realism to the scene. Oil Painting Techniques. With Van Eyck at the forefront, northern artists also began to experiment with new methods of painting. During the Middle Ages, most artists used tempera paint, a medium made of egg yolk mixed with pigment.

Painted Prints: Renaissance and Baroque Hand-Colored Engravings . Northern Renaissance Art: Painting, Sculpture, the Graphic Arts from 1350 to 1575. Revised by Larry Silver and Henry Luttikhuizen.

Painted Prints: Renaissance and Baroque Hand-Colored Engravings, Etchings, and Woodcuts", The Baltimore Museum of Art, 2002-2003, no. 17. Bibliography. Painted Prints: Renaissance and Baroque Hand-Colored Engravings, Etchings, and Woodcuts. Exh. cat. The Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore; The Saint Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 2002-2003. Upper Saddle River, 2005: 356-357, col. fig. 1. 4.

Susan Dackerman, Painted Prints: The Revelation of Color in Northern Renaissance and Baroque Engravings, Etchings and Woodcuts, exh. ca. Baltimore Museum of Art (Baltimore, MD, 2002), pp. 223-225, no. 46, reproduced. Painted Prints: The Revelation of Color in Northern Renaissance and Baroque Engravings, Etchings and Woodcuts, Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, 10/06/2002 - 01/05/2003; Saint Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 02/14/2003 - 05/18/2003. 32Q: 2440 Medieval, Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, 11/16/2014 - 03/18/2015.

An old master print with color is almost invariably regarded as a suspect object because the color is presumed to be a cosmetic addition made to compensate for deficiencies of design or condition. Painted Prints challenges this deeply entrenched assumption about the material and aesthetic structure of old master prints by showing that in many cases hand coloring is not a dubious supplement to a print but is instead an integral element augmenting its expressive power, beauty, and meaning.

Published in conjunction with an exhibition at The Baltimore Museum of Art and St. Louis Art Museum, Painted Prints reproduces and discusses a rich variety of hand-colored prints from Northern Europe of the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Anonymous woodcuts are juxtaposed with masterworks by such famed artists as Dürer, Holbein, and Goltzius. These prints, secular as well as religious, muted as well as vibrant in tonality, make it clear that hand coloring was a widespread, enduring practice, developed to satisfy the demands of both elite and popular audiences.

Painted Prints presents new research into the men and women who specialized in hand coloring and offers numerous insights into the social and economic organization of Renaissance and Baroque printmaking. It also draws on scientific analyses of the materials and techniques of hand coloring to address important questions of authenticity, chronology, and condition. With a catalogue and color illustrations of all the hand-colored prints in the exhibition, this book makes a groundbreaking contribution to the study of old master prints and their pivotal place in the visual culture of early modern Europe.

The exhibition, "Painted Prints: The Revelation of Color in Northern Renaissance and Baroque Engravings, Etchings, and Woodcuts," will be at The Baltimore Museum of Art from October 6, 2002, to January 5, 2003 and St. Louis Art Museum from February 14 to May 18, 2003.

Comments: (3)
Abywis
This extraordinary work is suitable for a limited group of readers--those who are willing to contemplate the thesis that not all great "art prints" must be in a black and white or otherwise monochromatic format. To this end the authors provide examples of prints by artists as great as Albrecht Duerer in stunningly beautiful color which was applied at the time of issuance of the prints. To be sure the authors strain a bit to find sufficient examples of prints which confirm their thesis, resorting to familiar illustrations from books which have been widely known for hundreds of years to have been colored in large quantities upon publication or later, of which an example is the 15th century Nuremberg Chronicle. It is a common phenomenon--wealthy Dutch families in the 17th century had Bibles extravagantly colored and heightened in gold while ordinary citizens made do with uncolored examples. Nonetheless the book contains sufficient surprising examples to fascinate those who study or collect prints or maps from the 15th and 16th centuries and who desire more information concerning when and under what circumstances color was applied to many of these materials. And for the professional colorist or art curator there is extensive information concerning the availability of color pigments in different time periods to assist in the task of determining when a specific work was colored or determining how to color an old work in black and white in a manner which is consistent with the period in which the work was created. Those who puzzle over such issues will give this volume a prominent place in their library while others will likely find it of little interest. I bought a number of copies of this book when it appeared and gave them to friends who collect or professionally color old maps and prints and they have all told me they found the work of great interest.
Funny duck
Very scholarly and well produced book. I am thrilled to own a hard to find book at a reasonable price
Dawncrusher
I like it