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eBook African Royal Court Art download

by Jane Marie Todd,Michèle Coquet

eBook African Royal Court Art download ISBN: 0226115755
Author: Jane Marie Todd,Michèle Coquet
Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (December 1, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 189
ePub: 1826 kb
Fb2: 1683 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: txt docx lrf mbr
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: History and Criticism

African Royal Court Art book. Michele Coquet, Jane Marie Todd (Translation).

African Royal Court Art book. In this visually stunning work, anthropologist Michèle Coquet presents the power and the brilliance of African court arts.

Michèle Coquet, African Royal Court Art, trans.

While Coquet's book is an admirable scholarly effort, Suzanne Blier's recent The Royal Arts of Africa . Nevertheless, Coquet's volume is recommended for libraries with an interest in art or African studies

While Coquet's book is an admirable scholarly effort, Suzanne Blier's recent The Royal Arts of Africa: The Majesty of Form (LJ 5/15/98) offers more incisive analyses of the manifold roles of royal art and provides a more diverse range of examples in words and illustrations. Nevertheless, Coquet's volume is recommended for libraries with an interest in art or African studies. Eugene C. Burt, Art Inst.

Introduction - Empires, kingdoms, and chieftaincies : the king's singularity - Few conceptions of the portrait - History told in images - Insignia of sovereignty and court objects - Elements of archaeology and history - Map of empires, ki. .

Introduction - Empires, kingdoms, and chieftaincies : the king's singularity - Few conceptions of the portrait - History told in images - Insignia of sovereignty and court objects - Elements of archaeology and history - Map of empires, kingdoms, and cities - Map of ethnic groups cited. Includes bibliographical references and index.

African royal court art; translated by Jane Marie Todd

African royal court art; translated by Jane Marie Todd. col. plates, map, bibliogr. Chicago, London: Univ. of Chicago Press, 1998. Coquet reconstructs the important relationship between traditional African art, known even to very modest villages, and the African states, many of which developed their own symbols of power and splendour not usually expected from peoples who have been described until recently as 'backward' and 'simple'. In Coquet's case, this is really an extension of her previous book on African textiles, as, after all, some of the splendid clothes worn by African chiefs became a part of that court representation.

Keywords: Michle, ISBN, Michle Coquet, Chicago Press, African Royal, royal court, Jane Marie, Marie Todd, Court Art.

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Muller, Jean-Claude "Michèle COQUET, African Royal Court Art. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press, 1998, xii + 181 . illustr. Anthropologie et Sociétés 24, no. 3 (2000) : 175–176.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Jane Marie Todd books online. African Royal Court Art. Michele Coquet. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles.

By MICHÈLE COQUET (trans. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1998. ART AND POWER African Royal Court Art. By MICHÈLE COQUET (trans. Pp. xi + 181. £4. 5 (ISBN 0-226-11575-5). - Volume 41 Issue 1 - CHARLES GORE.

In this visually stunning work, anthropologist Michèle Coquet presents the power and the brilliance of African court arts. Grounding her analysis in the social and historical context of traditional royalty systems, Coquet examines the diverse roles played by artisans, nobles, and kings in the production and use of royal objects. From the precolonial kingdoms of the Edo and the Yoruba, the Ashanti and the Igbo, Coquet reconstructs from a comparativist view the essential cultural connections between art, representation, and the king.More than ornamentation, royal objects embodied the strength and status of African rulers. The gold-plated stools of the Ashanti, the delicately carved ivory bracelets of the Edo-these objects were meant not simply to adorn but to affirm and enhance the power and prestige of the wearer. Unlike the abstract style frequently seen in African ritual art, realism became manifest in courtly arts. Realism directly linked the symbolic value of the object-a portrait or relief-with the physical person of the king. The contours of the monarch's face, his political and military exploits rendered on palace walls, became visual histories, the work of art in essence corroborating the ruler's sovereign might.Richly illustrated and wonderfully detailed, Coquet's influential volume offers both a splendid visual presentation and an authoritative analysis of African royal arts."[This] beautiful and exciting book emphasizes the skillful court art of the Benin, Dahomey, and the Kongo. A very interesting and unusual approach to the art of the continent that has been too easily situated 'outside of history.'"—Le Figaro