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eBook Gloriana: The Portraits of Queen Elizabeth I download

by Roy Strong

eBook Gloriana: The Portraits of Queen Elizabeth I download ISBN: 0500250987
Author: Roy Strong
Publisher: Thames & Hudson; 2nd edition (March 1, 1987)
Language: English
Pages: 180
ePub: 1195 kb
Fb2: 1523 kb
Rating: 4.9
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Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: History and Criticism

To examine the portraits of Elizabeth I is to witness the creation of the legend of the Virgin Queen, of Gloriana and her burgeoning empire

To examine the portraits of Elizabeth I is to witness the creation of the legend of the Virgin Queen, of Gloriana and her burgeoning empire. The history of the portraiture is that of the deliberate manufacture of an image powerful enough to hold together a people divided by both rigid hierarchy and religious belief. When Elizabeth came to the throne in 1558, her subjects To examine the portraits of Elizabeth I is to witness the creation of the legend of the Virgin Queen, of Gloriana and her burgeoning empire.

In Gloriana, Roy Strong provides a richly detailed analysis of all the major portraits. To examine the portraits of Elizabeth I is, as Roy Strong shows, to witness the creation of the legend of the Virgin Queen, of Gloriana and her burgeoning empire. Princess Elizabeth, 1533-58 ; Early portraits by Levina Teerlinc, 1558-76 ; Early portraits of the Queen, 1558-72 ; Elizabeth as the Divine Fountain of the Realm, 1565 ; 'Queen Elizabeth and the Three Goddesses', 1569 ; 'The allegory of the Tudor succession', 1572?

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Professor Strong writes about how Elizabeth I controlled her image by approving her official portraits. I loved the reproductions of paintings in that book, and so tracked down "Gloriana" to see and compare as many pictures of Elizabeth as I could. He notes that while she was of marriageable age that she wore a high neckline and ruff and appears, for instance, holding a sieve, as the Vestal Virgin, Tuccia. As soon as she was past marriageable age, however, down came the necklines, and up went the sun-like starched lace collar that framed her head: well into her 50s she became the forever-young goddess Astraea. I must say the pictures are great, and plentiful.

Portrait of Elizabeth I of England in her coronation robes. William Gaunt contrasts the simplicity of the 1546 portrait of Elizabeth Tudor as a Princess with later images of her as queen.

Gloriana, The Portraits of Queen Elizabeth I by Roy Strong (Thames and Hudson, 1987). Elizabeth the Queen by Alison Weir (Pimlico, 1999). The Portrait Miniature in England by Katherine Coombs (V&A Publications, 1998). Portrait Miniatures by Graham Reynolds (Cambridge University Press, 1988). Top. About the author. Katherine Coombs is Curator of Paintings at the V&A, and is the Museum's miniature specialist.

Автор: Strong Roy C. Название: Gloriana: The Portraits of Queen Elizabeth I Издательство: Random .

To examine the portraits of Elizabeth I is to witness the creation of the legend of the Virgin Queen, of Gloriana and her burgeoning empire

To examine the portraits of Elizabeth I is to witness the creation of the legend of the Virgin Queen, of Gloriana and her burgeoning empire. When Elizabeth came to the throne in 1558, her subjects had an all-too-vivid memory of military defeat and religious turmoil.

Roy Strong's Gloriana is a very handsome volume that is erudite, lucid and fascinatingly detailed about how these images were made and what they mean. The National Maritime Museum celebrated the 400th anniversary of Elizabeth's death in 2003 with splendidly dramatic exhibition. Anyone who missed it can still admire the catalogue, full of helpful essays and stunning images. 4. Elizabeth and Essex: a tragic history by Lytton Strachey (1928)

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A detailed analysis of all of the major portraits of Queen Elizabeth I demonstrates how the restoration of stability to her socially and religiously divided country depended on the image of the Queen as a deified, all-powerful monarch
Comments: (5)
Saintrius
Excellent history of Elizabeth I through art. Good history of the production and manufacturing of art for the public and techniques used for mass production. If you are interested in all things Elizabeth I, then this is a great addition to your library. The copy I purchased was listed in 'like new' condition and I found it to be in perfect shape.
Unirtay
Traces the cult of Elizabeth as a deliberate political move to control her public image. Deals with paintings as the main source for the development of her persona. Sadly, mainly black and white pics.
Tyler Is Not Here
Love this book. The scholarship. The comprehensive overview and chronology. Wish there were more in the color section, but hey, this book is a gift to anyone who wants to find out how the image of Elizabeth I evolved and why. You can just feel Her Majesty's strategy unveiled as you go along. All hail Gloriana!
Mpapa
I remember reading this fascinating book in grad school.

Professor Strong writes about how Elizabeth I controlled her image by approving her official portraits. He notes that while she was of marriageable age that she wore a high neckline and ruff and appears, for instance, holding a sieve, as the Vestal Virgin, Tuccia. As soon as she was past marriageable age, however, down came the necklines, and up went the sun-like starched lace collar that framed her head: well into her 50s she became the forever-young goddess Astraea.

In one of these portraits, she holds a rainbow; and her skirt depicts the eyes and ears of her wise councillors; a serpent of wisdom is embroidered on the sleeve of one arm. The legend says: "non sine sole Iris": There is no rainbow without the sun, and from the vermilion of her skirt, her flaming red hair, and the sun-like collar, it is clear that the 'sun' is Elizabeth herself.

I just wish I could now afford the price of this book. It is really worth reading!
OwerSpeed
I really liked this book! I enjoy reading about and researching the Tudors (by researching, I mean reading existing research). I have a book "All the Queen's Men: Elizabeth and her Courtiers" by Neville Williams. I loved the reproductions of paintings in that book, and so tracked down "Gloriana" to see and compare as many pictures of Elizabeth as I could. I must say the pictures are great, and plentiful. The text is well written too. It describes the art and explains the purpose of and evolution of the stylised portraits of Elizabeth. It's not the book's fault, but it was missing some things I hoped to find, as follows: few pictures of those close to Elizabeth (I shouldn't probably have expected this, but I like to look for family resemblances, and the looks of her suitors!); little text description of Elizabeth (based on the author's reseach, I hoped he'd tell us whether her eyes were blue or brown, how tall she was etc. Hard to tell from the art - the colors and proportions vary); and finally, some portraits that are described in the text are not illustrated. Not many, but I wanted to see more. That being said, you can't go wrong with this book if you want to study the portraits. I am very pleased to have this as part of my little Tudor library! (My copy is paperback, I have not seen the hardback.)