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eBook Adventures in the Soviet Imaginary: Soviet Children's Books and Graphic Art download

by Robert Bird

eBook Adventures in the Soviet Imaginary: Soviet Children's Books and Graphic Art download ISBN: 0943056403
Author: Robert Bird
Publisher: The University of Chicago Library (August 15, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 48
ePub: 1269 kb
Fb2: 1503 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mobi txt doc lit
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: History and Criticism

The children's books and posters in Adv Two of the most striking manifestations of Soviet image culture were the .

The children's books and posters in Adv Two of the most striking manifestations of Soviet image culture were the children's book and the poster. Both of these forms testify to the alliance between experimental aesthetics and radical socialist ideology that held tenuously from the 1917 revolutions to the mid-1930s - and did so much to shape a distinctly Soviet civilization. Lists with This Book. Nonfiction Books for Russophiles.

Robert Bird is professor of Russian literature and film at the University of Chicago

Robert Bird is professor of Russian literature and film at the University of Chicago. He is the author of books on Fyodor Dostoevsky, Viacheslav Ivanov, and Andrei Tarkovsky, and has published widely on the aesthetics of Russian modernism.

Alice D. Schreyer, Robert Bird, Radoslav Borislavov. Two of the most striking manifestations of Soviet image culture were the children's book and the poster. Both of these forms testify to the alliance between experimental aesthetics and radical socialist ideology that held, tenuously, from the 1917 revolutions to the mid-1930s - and did so much to shape a distinctly Soviet civilization. The children's books and posters in "Adventures in the Soviet Imaginary" plot the development of this new image culture alongside the formation of new social and cultural identities.

Items related to Adventures in the Soviet Imaginary: Soviet Children's. Robert Bird is professor of Russian literature and film at the University of Chicago. Adventures in the Soviet Imaginary: Soviet Children's Books and Graphic Art. ISBN 13: 9780943056401. The children’s books and posters in Adventures in the Soviet Imaginary plot the development of this new image culture alongside the formation of new social and cultural identities.

The children’s book developed in close alliance with radio, cinema and such graphic media as the poster. In E. Mikini’s Dom gde zhivut knigi (The House Where Books Live) books grow legs, characters come to life, films speak of their own free will, and children transform themselves in a cupboard of metamorphoses.

The children s books and posters in "Adventures in the Soviet Imaginary" plot the development of this new image culture. ISBN13: 9780943056401.

Children’s literature of the Soviet Union never failed to mirror the volatile political climate of the Soviet state. Adventures in the Soviet Imaginary: Children’s Books and Graphic Art. The University of Chicago Library. Between the end of the civil war (1917-1922) and the rise of Stalinism (1929-1953), the Soviet leadership introduced various pedagogical innovations for educating and socializing a generation of socialist youth.

Adventures in the Soviet Imaginary: Soviet Children's Books and Graphic Art (Chicago: University o fChicago Library, 2011), 19-21. Book awarded the 2012 American Library Association Leab Exhibition Award. in Robert Bird, ed. Adventures in the Soviet Imaginary: Soviet Children's Books and Graphic Art (Chicago: University o fChicago Library, 2011), 19-21.

Two of the most striking manifestations of Soviet image culture were the children’s book and the poster. Both of these forms testify to the alliance between experimental aesthetics and radical socialist ideology that held tenuously from the 1917 revolutions to the mid-1930s—and did so much to shape a distinctly Soviet civilization. The children’s books and posters in Adventures in the Soviet Imaginary plot the development of this new image culture alongside the formation of new social and cultural identities.

Described here and set in context by experts in the field, the University of Chicago Library’s collections of Soviet graphic art allow one to trace the complex relationship between Soviet ideology and aesthetic culture over a crucial period, from the beginning of Stalin’s Great Breakthrough in 1928 to the reconstruction and regrouping that followed World War II.