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eBook Art, Religion, and Politics In Medieval China download

by Qiang Ning

eBook Art, Religion, and Politics In Medieval China download ISBN: 0824827031
Author: Qiang Ning
Publisher: Univ of Hawaii Pr (March 1, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1272 kb
Fb2: 1240 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: rtf mbr lrf mobi
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: History and Criticism

This book is a case study of Dunhuang Cave 220, completed in 642 through the . The author is again partial to local politics in his explanation. Citation: Angela Howard.

This book is a case study of Dunhuang Cave 220, completed in 642 through the sponsorship of the prominent Zhai family, which continued to supervise the cave's upkeep until the tenth century. Ning Qiang has chosen the cave for several reasons; it is dated, we know the identity of its patrons, and its décor manifests stylistic and doctrinal innovations.

The cave-temple complex popularly known as the Dunhuang caves is the world's largest extant repository of Tang Buddhist art. Among the best preserved of the Dunhuang caves is the Zhai Family Cave, built in 642. It is this remarkable cave-temple that forms the focus of Ning Qiang's cross-disciplinary exploration of the interrelationship of art, religion, and politics during the Tang.

Published by: University of Hawai'i Press. Book Description: The cave-temple complex popularly known as the Dunhuang caves is the world's largest extant repository of Tang Buddhist art. The author combines, in his careful examination of the paintings and sculptures found there, the historical study of pictures with the pictorial study of history.

This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef. Early China, Vol. 30, Issue. Art, Religion, and Politics in Medieval China: The Dunhuang Cave of the Zhai Family. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 2004.

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Ning Qiang's books. Art, Religion, and Politics in Medieval China: The Dunhuang Cave of the Zhai Family by. Ning Qiang’s Followers (1). Ning Qiang. Ning Qiang, Qiang Ning.

It is this remarkable cave-temple that forms the focus of Ning Qiang's cross-disciplinary exploration of the interrelationship of art, religion, and politics during the Tang. The greatest value of this valuable book is its exposition of the two experts' methods as they have disassembled and reassembled their evidence over their twenty years of co-operation.

Art, religion, and politics in medieval China: the Dunhuang cave of the Zhai Family. University of Hawaii Press, 2004, p. 132. 7 Ibid. Aside from the Cave art at Dunhuang and the painting techniques in Dunhuang art, China also imported the Buddhist art practice of ‘temple culture,’ which is the concentration of wealth, money, manpower, materials, artistic talents and engineering skills in the creation of holy shrine that would serve as the cultural center of the society 10.

Alison Jones provided us with an excellent summary of the discussions that took place

Alison Jones provided us with an excellent summary of the discussions that took place. We are grateful to the scholars whose work appears in this volume for their flexibility in looking beyond disciplinary boundaries to explore the broad issues addressed in the book. Though their writing is not repre- sented here, Eriberto Lozada, David Palmer, and Ning Qiang made im- portant contributions to the development of the ideas expressed

For many of China's citizens, their religion is a defining feature alongside their national pride. Religion today is growing in diversity and openness to the worldwide context. No religion has ever assumed a dominant position in China.

For many of China's citizens, their religion is a defining feature alongside their national pride. The Diversity of Religion in China. While many think of China as a homogenous culture, it may surprise you to learn that the religious scene in China is quite diverse. Foreign religions, influenced by time-honored Chinese Culture and tradition, have gradually become fixtures with distinctive Chinese characteristics. The four major religions in China (Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, and Christianity) each have a long history of influence.

New currents in philosophy, religion, and intellectual life emerged to leave an indelible mark on the subsequent development of Chinese . Music Mind and Politics in Xi Kang. 11 Destiny and Retribution in Early Medieval China.

New currents in philosophy, religion, and intellectual life emerged to leave an indelible mark on the subsequent development of Chinese thought and culture. This period saw the rise of xuanxue ( dark learning or learning of the mysterious Dao ), the establishment of religious Daoism, and the rise of Buddhism. In examining the key ideas of xuanxue and focusing on its main proponents, the contributors to this volume call into question the often-presumed monolithic identity of this broad philosophical front.

The cave-temple complex popularly known as the Dunhuang caves is the world's largest extant repository of Tang Buddhist art. Among the best preserved of the Dunhuang caves is the Zhai Family Cave, built in 642. It is this remarkable cave-temple that forms the focus of Ning Qiang's cross-disciplinary exploration of the interrelationship of art, religion, and politics during the Tang. In his careful examination of the paintings and sculptures found there, the author combines the historical study of pictures with the pictorial study of history. By employing this two-fold approach, he is able to refer to textual evidence in interpreting the formal features of the cave-temple paintings and to employ visual details to fill in the historical gaps inevitably left by text-oriented scholars. The result is a comprehensive analysis of the visual culture of the period and a vivid description of social life in medieval China. The original Zhai Family Cave pictures were painted over in the tenth century and remained hidden until the early 1940s. Once exposed, the early artwork appeared fresh and colorful in comparison with other Tang paintings at Dunhuang.