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eBook Klee Wyck download

by Kathryn Bridge,Emily Carr

eBook Klee Wyck download ISBN: 1553650271
Author: Kathryn Bridge,Emily Carr
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre; First Edition edition (March 11, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 144
ePub: 1595 kb
Fb2: 1414 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mobi lrf lrf txt
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Emily Carr’s first book, published in 1941, was titled Klee Wyck ("Laughing One"), in honour of the name that the Native people of the west coast gave to her. This collection of twenty-one word sketches about Native people.

Emily Carr’s first book, published in 1941, was titled Klee Wyck ("Laughing One"), in honour of the name that the Native people of the west coast gave to her. This collection of twenty-one word sketches about Native people describes her visits and travels as she painted their totem poles and villages. In print ever since, it has been read and loved by several generations of Canadians, and has also been translated into French and Japanese. Kathryn Bridge, who, as an archivist, has long been well acquainted with the work of Emily Carr, has written an absorbing introduction that places Klee Wyck and Emily Carr in historical and literary context and provides interesting new information.

Emily Carr wrote these twenty-one word sketches after visiting and living with Native people, painting their totem . In her intriguing introduction, archivist and writer Kathryn Bridge puts Klee Wyck into the context of Emily Carr's life and reveals the story behind the expurgations.

Emily Carr wrote these twenty-one word sketches after visiting and living with Native people, painting their totem poles and villages, many of them in wild and remote areas. She tells her stories with beauty, pathos and a vivid awareness of the comedy of people and situations.

Emily Carr (Author), Kathryn Bridge (Introduction). Make sure you also view the book, Emily Carr Country, with photographs by Courtney Milne, of the some of places and totem poles described in Klee Wyck. 3 people found this helpful.

Лицензия Creative Commons – Attribution (разрешено повторное использование).

He knew where the bobbing kelp nobs grew and that their long, hose-like tubes were waiting to strangle his propeller ky overhead. Everything looked safe, but Jimmie knew how treacherous the bottom of Skedans Bay was; that’s why he lay across the bow of his boat, anxiously peering into the water and motioning to Louisa his wife, who was at the wheel. The engine stopped far out. There was the plop and gurgle of the anchor striking and settling and then the sigh of the little canoe being pushed over.

Klee Wyck (1941) is a memoir by Canadian artist Emily Carr. Through short sketches, the artist tells of her experiences among First Nations people and cultures on British Columbia's west coast. The book won the 1941 Governor General's Award and occupies an important place in Canadian literature. Emily Carr (1871 - 1945) is one of western Canada's most well-known artists.

Douglas & McIntyre is proud to announce definitive, completely redesigned editions of Emily Carr’s seven enduring classic books. These are beautifully crafted keepsake editions of the literary world of Emily Carr, each with an introduction by a distinguished Canadian writer or authority on Emily Carr and her work.Emily Carr’s first book, published in 1941, was titled Klee Wyck ("Laughing One"), in honour of the name that the Native people of the west coast gave to her. This collection of twenty-one word sketches about Native people describes her visits and travels as she painted their totem poles and villages. Vital and direct, aware and poignant, it is as well regarded today as when it was first published in 1941 to instant and wide acclaim, winning the Governor General’s Award for Non-fiction. In print ever since, it has been read and loved by several generations of Canadians, and has also been translated into French and Japanese.Kathryn Bridge, who, as an archivist, has long been well acquainted with the work of Emily Carr, has written an absorbing introduction that places Klee Wyck and Emily Carr in historical and literary context and provides interesting new information.
Comments: (7)
Cordabor
I picked this book up at a friends while caring for her kitty. I began reading and was instantly drawn into this intimate view of a Time now gone. In a Northwest I’m familiar with I could see and smell and feel her adventure and the glimpse into the lives of the “Indians”. People who have stayed with me. Haunting. Simple. Real.
Lucam
Painter Emily Carr's early 19th-century ability to empathize with Western Canada's native peoples, and her scathing remarks on missionary obtuseness, are amazingly clear, direct, and insightful. And the fact that her writings were in print for 50 years only in expurgated form must be horrifying to any writer. A native "face-reader" sums her up: "she has no fear, she's not stuck up, and she knows how to laugh." Her writings bear him out perfectly.
Swift Summer
"Klee Wyck" is a simple and lovely record of events from Emily Carr's life. I am so drawn to her spirit of openness and acceptance to the indigenous people and the natural world around her. I had to visit her part of the world for myself. She captivated me..
Saithinin
Emily Carr is known in our time as a wonderful, regional Expressionist painter whose subjects are Pacific Northwest landscapes. But as a writer, she intimately reveals the quiet beauty of women's lives in the region. Klee Wyck is a series of perfectly polished vignettes of Carr's encounters. I hear it's required reading in the British Columbia school system. To me, it's essential reading to feel the region.
Mejora
Memories of earlier days on Vancouver Island, with a young Emily Carr traveling to not yet abandoned villages in the forests.
Impala Frozen
The writing is beautiful and evocative leaving me with so many unanswered questions such as why were the native women's children dying one after the other? Be careful of the kindle version - it is full of errors which totally ruins the experience of reading this wonderful book. If I hear back from Amazon that they have remedied this situation I'll come back and change this review
Doomwarden
One of the most amazing persons and such an excellent writer. Her descriptions of the places she visits and the people she meets along the way are so vivid. she does not write in abstract thoughts but with vivid images. Make sure you also view the book, Emily Carr Country, with photographs by Courtney Milne, of the some of places and totem poles described in Klee Wyck.
Sympathetic lyrical sketches that are as appealing as Carr's paintings.