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eBook The coming of the book: The impact of printing 1450-1800 (Foundations of history library) download

by Henri-Jean Martin,Lucien Paul Victor Febvre

eBook The coming of the book: The impact of printing 1450-1800 (Foundations of history library) download ISBN: 0902308173
Author: Henri-Jean Martin,Lucien Paul Victor Febvre
Publisher: N.L.B (1976)
Language: English
Pages: 378
ePub: 1809 kb
Fb2: 1123 kb
Rating: 4.7
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Subcategory: History and Criticism

The Coming of the Book was conceived by co-author Lucien Febvre, one of the legendary founders of the French . In the Annales style, The Coming of the Book is laden with facts: people, places, dates.

The Coming of the Book was conceived by co-author Lucien Febvre, one of the legendary founders of the French Annales approach to history. He died during its preparation, and it was completed by Henri-Jean Martin and published in French in 1958. The translation by David Gerard was first published in 1976. It boasts a 30-page index, the contents of which are almost all proper names. In the text these 15th and 16th century people fly by in what is, for me, a mind-numbing parade.

286 books - 333 voters. Print Culture & the History of the Book. Lucien Paul Victor Febvre was a French historian best known for the role he played in establishing the Annales School of history. Negli anni cinquanta due francesi, Lucienne Febvre e Henri-Jean Martin pubblicarono un libro intitolato: "La nascita del libro che segnò, appunto, la nascita di una nuoca disciplina di studio: il libro. L’obiettivo dello studio era l’analisi della funzione del libro nella cultura europea. Books by Lucien Febvre

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Book by Lucien Paul Victor Febvre, Henri-Jean Martin. Lucien Febvre, who died in 1956, was cofounder of the influential journal Annales, and is widely recognized as one of the foremost historians of the twentieth century. About the Author: Lucien Febvre, who died in 1956, was cofounder of the influential journal Annales, and is widely recognized as one of the foremost historians of the twentieth century. Henri-Jean Martin is a distinguished historian of the development of early printing.

Lucien Paul Victor Febvre (French: ; 22 July 1878 – 11 September 1956) was a French . The Coming of the Book: The Impact of Printing 1450–1800, co-written with Henri-Jean Martin, London 1976. L'apparition du livre, Paris 1958).

Lucien Paul Victor Febvre (French: ; 22 July 1878 – 11 September 1956) was a French historian best known for the role he played in establishing the Annales School of history. L'apparition du livre, Paris 1958)

Lucien Febvre, who died in 1956, was cofounder of the influential journal Annales, and is widely recognized as one of the foremost historians of the twentieth century.

Lucien Febvre, who died in 1956, was cofounder of the influential journal Annales, and is widely recognized as one of the foremost historians of the twentieth century.

378 pages : 22 cm. Translation of L'apparition du livre. Includes bibliographical references and index. Includes bibliographical references and index

by Henri-Jean Martin, Lucien Febvre. Work-to-work relationships.

by Henri-Jean Martin, Lucien Febvre. For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.

The Newberry Library. Recommend this journal. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 24 February 2017. History of Education Quarterly.

Henri-Jean Martin (16 January 1924 – 13 January 2007) was a leading authority on the history of the book in Europe, and an expert on the history of writing and printing. He was a leader in efforts to promote libraries in France, and the history of libraries and printing. Born in Paris, Henri-Jean Martin's initial professional position was that of conservateur in the réserve des imprimés of the Bibliothèque nationale, a position he held from 1947 to 1958.

Book by Lucien Paul Victor Febvre, Henri-Jean Martin
Comments: (7)
Xlisiahal
This book doesn't pretend to be other than what it is: a scholarly treatise on the impact of the whole printing ecosystem on universities, booksellers, venture capitalists (such as they were), governments, and the common man.

As an academic myself, I'm ashamed that some of us seem to have the disease of writing in a way designed to make other people think we are clever, rather than designed to be readable. While many scholarly books suffer from that disease and are dense and musty to read, filled with overblown academic prose, this one is highly readable, even (especially?) in translation.

This is a niche subject and this book has a niche audience -- people fascinated not only with how the spread of books influenced the spread of ideas, but how the technological and economic systems around printing affected almost every stratum of society. If you're part of that niche, you'll enjoy it. I wish it were available in Kindle form.
Wrathshaper
I am no expert on the early history of book printing, just a curious bystander, so I ordered The Coming of the Book because it sounded interesting. (I had already read Elizabeth Eisenstein's The Printing Revolution in Early Modern Europe, which I enjoyed a great deal.)

So what can one say about a 50-year-old work that one has just read for the first time? The Coming of the Book was conceived by co-author Lucien Febvre, one of the legendary founders of the French Annales approach to history. He died during its preparation, and it was completed by Henri-Jean Martin and published in French in 1958. The translation by David Gerard was first published in 1976.

In the Annales style, The Coming of the Book is laden with facts: people, places, dates. It boasts a 30-page index, the contents of which are almost all proper names. In the text these 15th and 16th century people fly by in what is, for me, a mind-numbing parade. The fact that it is a translation does not help its readability. The book is hard work.

But the work is rewarded. The scope of The Coming of the Book is vast and its scholarship is remarkable. From the development of markets for paper to the diffusion of technical knowledge to specialized areas like finance, labor, and regulation, Febvre and Martin provide exhaustive documentation. But it is not only trees. The forest is there as well, in the relationship between publishing and academia, publishing and religion (i.e., the Reformation), and the shift from publishing "the classics" to publishing contemporary works.

So should you read this book? If you are new to the field it is not the place to start. Eisenstein's volume (see above) is much more readable. But if you want to move on from there and are willing to put forth the effort, this one is itself a classic.
Cashoutmaster
A thorough documentary of the ins and outs of the beginning of the book I was hoping for something with more of the 'why and what happened' nature. The book remains very readable and pertinent despite being written some time ago. However as a history buff I was hoping for more about the very beginning of the printing press which the author admits is very thinly documented. The printing press changed the world as the internet is doing today. It must have generated strong emotions on both sides of the issue of granting literacy to the world. I'm still looking.
Tat
The written word isn't going away. Prose may read from the commercial to poetic, we may read more package copy than works of literature, and more off a screen or monitor than printed on the page; but read we do and will continue to do. One could say that reading is as natural (and necessary) a function as breathing, eating or drinking; but, in fact, the book has an techno/economic/political origin. And, why not learn something of that origin? Just how did the book happen? Why? And, once the proverbial genii left the bottle, how did the book change everything? Things just don't happen. Dots are not just connected. Or are they?

Febvre and Martin explain it all and with all its historical, political and economic implications. David Gerard translation is lucid and fluid and the book is a lovely read.
Uscavel
This is one of my favorite books that explores the early history of the book in Europe. It is a bit Franco-centric, probably because the author is French, but nonetheless it is a wealth of information about incunabula, featuring interesting details and stories about the subject. I highly recommend it if you are a bibliophile.
Sirara
great book