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by Annie Cohen-Solal

eBook Painting American: The Rise of American Artists, Paris 1867-New York 1948 download ISBN: 0679450939
Author: Annie Cohen-Solal
Publisher: Knopf; 1st edition (October 16, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 448
ePub: 1972 kb
Fb2: 1376 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mbr docx mobi azw
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Painting American book.

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In the 19th century, American artists had to travel to France for validation; by the mid 20th century, the center of the art . Cohen-Solal leaves interesting questions-such as why Americans and American artists responded to Impressionism before the French-unanswered

In the 19th century, American artists had to travel to France for validation; by the mid 20th century, the center of the art world had shifted to the United States. Cohen-Solal leaves interesting questions-such as why Americans and American artists responded to Impressionism before the French-unanswered. And the text has several factual errors, for example she writes of an American "economic boom" in 1894, when that year marked the first of a 4-year economic depression in America.

In this magnificent historical panorama, Annie Cohen-Solal shows how American pragmatism furnished the .

In this magnificent historical panorama, Annie Cohen-Solal shows how American pragmatism furnished the solution: Learn from the best.

Annie Cohen-Solal is a French sociologist, academic and writer . Born in pre-independence Algeria, she is part of the Jewish diaspora that left that country for France during the Algerian War of Independence. Painting American: The Rise of American Artists, Paris 1867-New York 1948, Translated Laurie Hurwitz-Attias, Knopf, 2001, ISBN 9780679450931.

Laurie Hurwitz-Attias, New York, Alfred A. Knopf, 2001. French Un jour, ils auront des peintres : l’avènement des peintres Américains, Paris 1867-New York 1948, 462 pp, Paris, Gallimard, 2000. Dutch Naar levend model: De opkomst van de Amerikaanse kunst, 494 pp, trans. Truus Boot, Amsterdam, Meulenhoff, 2003. Italian Americani per sempre, I pittori di un mondo nuovo, Parigi 1867-New York 1948, 497 pp, trans. Manuela Bertone, Milan Johan & Levi, 2006. Liberation’s blog : Rothko Journal

The Rise of American Artists, Paris 1867-New York 1948. Shortly after the Civil War, a resurgent America strode brashly onto the hallowed ground of the Paris salon to present its most distinguished painters in the Exposition Universelle of 1867.

Painting American : The Rise of American Artists, Paris 1867-New York 1948. by Annie Cohen-Solal. Their offereings included majestic Western waterfalls, magnificent portraits, sprawling landscapes-the cream of a nation ready to assert itself culturally as it had begun to do so economically. The Americans sat back to bask in anticipated applause.

Annie Cohen-Solal, a veteran French cultural historian and biographer of ­Sartre, sets out to fill this . Painting American: The Rise of American Artists, Paris 1867-New York 1948, Translated Laurie Hurwitz-Attias, Knopf, 2001,. From 1989 to 1993, Cohen-Solal served as Cultural Counselor at the French Embassy in the United States.

Annie Cohen-Solal is a French academic and writer.

SUBTITLED The Rise of American Artists: Paris 1867-New York 1948, this lengthy, digressive and intermittently fascinating book is the work of a French writer, teacher and former cultural counsellor at the French embassy in New York.

Shortly after the Civil War, a resurgent America strode brashly onto the hallowed ground of the Paris salon to present its most distinguished painters in the Exposition Universelle of 1867. Their offereings included majestic Western waterfalls, magnificent portraits, sprawling landscapes--the cream of a nation ready to assert itself culturally as it had begun to do so economically. The Americans sat back to bask in anticipated applause.But their confidence would be shattered when the luminaries of the French Academy condemned the spectacle as being unworthy of the great nation that had produced it. The rebuke provoked widespread soulsearching in America: Why was the land of Melville and Poe unable to produce paintings of comparable power? How was it to claim a place among nations producing art of real consequence?In this magnificent historical panorama, Annie Cohen-Solal shows how American pragmatism furnished the solution: Learn from the best. The French were then the undisputed masters of painting, and so to France the Americans went in hordes, apprenticing themselves in the studios of reknowned masters--Gérôme, Cabanel, and others--or founding colonies such as the legendary one at Pont-Aven. From the seeds of their individual efforts would grow an extraordinary crop, one that included not only the great--Whistler, Cassatt, Sargent--but a legion of artists of all ranks who collectively pushed forward a bold new American enterprise. In two generations, Paris would be eclipsed, and the greatest French artists would begin coming to New York to be at the new center of everything.Meticulously researched and presented as a captivating story, this book tells the saga of the rise of American artists as we have never had it before: a surging transatlatic ebb and flow of cultural energies, driven by innumberable fascinating individuals--painters, collectors, critics, titans of industry--some of them now famous, others forgotten. Informed throughout by the author's unique perspective as a scholar, a writer, and a cultural diplomat, Painting American offers an utterly new understanding of one of the greatest changes in cultural history.
Comments: (3)
Aurizar
I have nearly completed 'Painting American' and have found it to be a fine review of an interesting period. As a student of the American Gilded Age I found that Cohen-Solal's book represented this period well. Yes, there are some inaccuracies (i.e. George Hearst not George Hearn. Cornelius Vanderbilt did not buy Rosa Bonheur paintings, his son William H did) but what made the book interesting to me was her use of seldom accessed European sources written at the turn of the century; newspaper reviews of America and American artists, rare memoirs of the various players, even buisness files of art dealers. This is something unlikely to be found from an American historian writing on the same subject. Does the book have a 'French slant' as the previous reviewer objects to? Well, yes because France absolutely was THE main source of art training and education at that time. There's no way around that. If that bothers the previous reviewer then he better not read any books about the history of American architecture for he would find that nearly all the leading American architects of that period were trained in Paris and therefore most of their creations in this country are Beaux Arts inspired. This includes the New York Met Museum, most of the still standing Gilded Age mansions, the interior decoration of the White House (subcontracted out to a French firm by McKim, Reed and White), etc.
Sataxe
I became immediately suspicious of this book when I noticed that only one of the blurbs on the back cover came from an art historian of this period; the others were from a historian, pop-historian Ken Burns, a museum director, and Kirkus Reviews. And in reading the book, I understand why no other scholars of 19th & 20th century American art reviewed the text. In overwrought prose, alternatively patronizing and celebratory, Cohen-Solal suggests that France is responsible for all that is good in American art. As an author born in Algeria, I would think that she would avoid such a colonialist paradigm. She misses completely that the experience of American artists was one of transatlantic exchange, as they worked to reconcile their European training with their American environment. Cohen-Solal leaves interesting questions--such as why Americans and American artists responded to Impressionism before the French--unanswered. And the text has several factual errors, for example she writes of an American "economic boom" in 1894, when that year marked the first of a 4-year economic depression in America. For those interested in a text on this subject, but one that focuses on exchange instead of a franco-centric bias, I would suggest Wanda Corn's The Great American Thing.
Clandratha
This is a thoughtful, good historical read about the history of art in America from the late 1800s to the mid 40s. I appreciated the explanations as to why art is not, for the most part, valued in the U.S. We seem to view fine craft as a good goal and fine ambition but paintings and sculpture, the non-practical' arts, are not understood or even thought to be of value.
Ms. Cohen-Solal's explanation, and I think a sound one, describes the early settlers and how our religious roots molded our view of fine art as not providing enough humility and as not practical, ie useful. Because this thought largely prevails today it seemed completely plausible to me.