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eBook Bohemians : The Glamorous Outcasts download

by Elizabeth Wilson

eBook Bohemians : The Glamorous Outcasts download ISBN: 1860647820
Author: Elizabeth Wilson
Publisher: I B Tauris & Co Ltd (September 30, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1685 kb
Fb2: 1914 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: azw docx txt azw
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Bohemians: The Glamorous Outcasts Hardcover – November 1, 2000

Bohemians: The Glamorous Outcasts Hardcover – November 1, 2000. by. Elizabeth Wilson (Author). Elizabeth Wilson's work on bohemians is primarily an academic or historical study, meant to answer the question, "who were the bohemians?" She proceeds to answer the question in thoroughly historical and academic fashion, addressing different phases and locations of Bohemia over time, along with its leading figures. Wilson also covers the various ideologies held by the bohemians, as well as setting forward theories regarding the reason for the endurance and existence of this kind of enduring counter-culture.

Bohemians: The Glamorous Outcasts

Bohemians: The Glamorous Outcasts. Elizabeth Wilson. Elizabeth Wilson's enjoyable book is a quest for the many shifting Since the early nineteenth century, the bohemian has been the protagonist of the story the West has wanted to hear about its artists-a story of genius, glamour, and doom. The bohemian takes on many guises: the artist dying in poverty like Modigliani or an outrageous entertainer like Josephine Baker. Elizabeth Wilson's enjoyable book is a quest for the many shifting meanings that constitute the bohemian and bohemia.

Wilson is strong on the women of bohemia, emphasising their role in relation both to their own circle and the outside world. The most commonly occurring types were the seamstresses, such as Mimi in La Bohème, who wore grey material which gave them their name: grisettes.

Bohemians : the glamorous outcasts. Bohemians : the glamorous outcasts. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Wilson, Elizabeth, 1936-. Internet Archive Books.

Bohemians: the glamorous outcasts. Elizabeth Wilson is a professor of cultural studies at the University of North London. Bohemianism is not so easy to define as one might think, but in this serious historical analysis, Wilson (cultural studies, Univ. of North London) does an excellent job of illuminating its multiple. She has published several books, including The Sphinx in the City and Hallucinations: Life in the Post-Modern City.

Bohemians : The Glamorous Outcasts Paperback – September 30, 2002

Bohemians : The Glamorous Outcasts Paperback – September 30, 2002. Библиографические данные. Bohemians: The Glamorous Outcasts Tauris Parke paperbacks. Published by Tauris Parke Paperbacks, 2002. This book analyzes the many shifting meanings that constitute bohemia and the bohemian

Bohemians: The Glamorous Outcasts. ISBN 10: 1860647820, ISBN 13: 9781860647826. This book analyzes the many shifting meanings that constitute bohemia and the bohemian. With a huge cast of real-life characters, from Chatterton to Jackson Pollock to Augustus John, she explores the bohemians eccentric use of dress, the role of sex and erotic love, the quest for excess, and their intransigent politics. She demonstrates how, rather than disappearing from Western culture, bohemia is at the core of the most heated cultural debates at the end of the second millennium. Published by Tauris Parke Paperbacks. There are maps both in Elizabeth Wilson’s book, which deals with bohemians in general, and in Andrew Barrow’s, which is a study of two in particular, but the street plans of Soho, Paris or Munich are not much use as a guide to the subject. Bohemia is a country of the mind, a flying island that may land anywhere and take off again just as quickly.

The glamorous outcasts. Wilson’s remarkable Bohemians is a quest for the many shifting meanings that constitute bohemianism

The glamorous outcasts. Since the early nineteenth century, the bohemian has been the hero of the story the West has wanted to hear about its artists: a story of genius, glamour and doom. The bohemian is variously the artist dying in poverty like Chatterton or a successful self-destroyer like Jackson Pollock. Wilson’s remarkable Bohemians is a quest for the many shifting meanings that constitute bohemianism.

Since the early 19th century, the bohemian has been the protagonist of the story the West has wanted to hear about its artists - a story of genius, glamour, and doom. This book analyzes the many shifting meanings that constitute bohemia and the bohemian. With a huge cast of real-life characters, from Chatterton to Jackson Pollock to Augustus John, she explores the bohemians eccentric use of dress, the role of sex and erotic love, the quest for excess, and their intransigent politics. She demonstrates how, rather than disappearing from Western culture, bohemia is at the core of the most heated cultural debates at the end of the second millennium.
Comments: (4)
Globus
i actually really like this book & i am not an intellectual featherweight. i agree to an extent w/ the above- or belownoted comments; there are probably wavery facts herein. i wish there werent. unfortunately, that is something i see continually in non-fiction books, particularly bothersome when the reader [such as the other reviewer or myself] actually knows the obscure facts. i would say this problem is an artefact of the postpostmodern age, but i am certain it predates it. having seen so many supposed historical accounts resplendent w/ the same issues, i can only wonder how much we really know about anything that predates or is distant from our own situational awareness.

this book is, however, an excellent overview of a subject which should have but strangely has not been accorded too much book length scrutiny. since the bohemian contingent of postpostmodern life has been co-opted into the macrocosm &, in commitment, reduced to the nanocosm, perhaps people who pick this up will be more inspired & enlightened. @this point, there is not that much better in this realm for which one can hope.
Whiteflame
A 1 seller! Im very happy!
Error parents
Elizabeth Wilson's work on bohemians is primarily an academic or historical study, meant to answer the question, "who were the bohemians?" She proceeds to answer the question in thoroughly historical and academic fashion, addressing different phases and locations of Bohemia over time, along with its leading figures. Wilson also covers the various ideologies held by the bohemians, as well as setting forward theories regarding the reason for the endurance and existence of this kind of enduring counter-culture. I rather wish this book had been included in my college history class on the Beats and Hippies, for while we did cover some of their bohemian predecessors, nothing was as extensive as Bohemians: the glamorous outcasts.

Particularly of note are the many chapters Wilson devoted to women in bohemian circles, as well as some of the other self-contradicting aspects of these counter-cultural personage's lives. Bohemians may have talked an awful lot about personal freedom and liberation, for example, but in reality many of the men kept their women in very traditional home roles. Wilson also spends time on the ways in which bohemians reacted to their haunts and activities becoming publicized or entering the mainstream which they opposed. Later chapters also touch on different philosophies and rebellious attitudes that overlapped with bohemia, such as hippies, punks, communism and postmodernism. Of course, as with many academic books, there never is a single clear answer to the stated question of who the bohemians were, if only because it changed over time.

For being an academic work, complete with extensive footnotes at the end of chapters, Bohemians: the glamorous outcasts makes for a fairly compelling read, especially since it covers such interesting topics. Wilson begins with theories about art in the modern world, and ends with a commentary on pop culture, giving it a very broad range of relevancy, in terms of potential readers at a collegiate level. I could even see it being used in a modern history survey class, at least individual chapters, though it is more geared towards history of the counter-culture or art and literature. I certainly found it to be an eye-opening look at the modern world.
Kizshura
Another unnecessary tome of the "publish or perish" variety. It merely documents that the author has identified and consulted written accounts of the phenomenon from the last 150 years and patched together a narrative that is very much of the cut-and-paste variety. No original research is evidenced; and where the author had the opportunity to correct gross errors of fact in sources quoted, it's just too much bother. To wit: on p. 237, "La Goulue...still there in the 1930s... In the background..stands an old man...Valentin-le-Désossé, her old dancing partner." Well, La Goulue was dead by early 1929 (30 Jan. to be exact), and her partner Valentin had slipped back into the perfectly bourgeois existence that he emerged from - to die in 1907.

On p. 246, Mrs. Wilson gives us two paragraphs on a "certain" Dr. Walter Serner (1889-1942). She appears to know nothing about him as a writer (of brilliantly unique short stories), but insists that he eventually disappears in the Soviet Union, "perhaps in search of the bohemian's always elusive utopia".

This romanticizing nonsense is especially galling, considering that Serner suffered the usual fate the Nazis had in store for Jews: he and his wife were arrested in Prague in 1942 and murdered a few months later, probably in Auschwitz.

The author's website tells us that she has written an autobiography at age 45, and is a feminist, lesbian and social activist. I'd say stick to it.