carnevalemanfredonia.it

eBook Francis Bacon download

by Matthew Gale,Chris Stephens

eBook Francis Bacon download ISBN: 1854378244
Author: Matthew Gale,Chris Stephens
Publisher: Tate Publishing (September 1, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1755 kb
Fb2: 1138 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: docx lrf doc lrf
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: History and Criticism

The text is well organized and recommended for the beginning seeking knowledge about Bacon.

The text is well organized and recommended for the beginning seeking knowledge about Bacon. One person found this helpful.

made by marina-marchenko.

Francis Bacon, exhibition catalogue, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris 1996. The exhibition's co-curator, Chris Stephens and Tate archivist Adrian Glew, examine letters, photographs and other original archive material to lear. lay. 1 Studio, vo. 00, August 1930, p. 40-1.

Francis Bacon (28 October 1909 – 28 April 1992) was an Irish-born British figurative painter known for his emotionally charged raw imagery and fixation on personal motifs

Francis Bacon (28 October 1909 – 28 April 1992) was an Irish-born British figurative painter known for his emotionally charged raw imagery and fixation on personal motifs. Best known for his depictions of popes, crucifixions and portraits of close friends, his abstracted figures are typically isolated in geometrical cages which give them vague 3D depth, set against flat, nondescript backgrounds.

The Francis Bacon of this book lived between 1909 and 1992. Francis Bacon’s work seems to increase in stature as time goes on, with his paintings achieving record prices at auction.

1854377388 (ISBN13: 9781854377388). The Francis Bacon of this book lived between 1909 and 1992. He is regarded along with . Turner, as Britain’s greatest modern painter. In 1946, the critic and then Director of the National Gallery, Sir The job of the artist is always to deepen the mystery. One critic said that along with Willem de Kooning, he was the most important painter in the 1950s of the disquieting human figure.

Matthew Gale, Chris Stephens. Francis Bacon’s style was so personal and distinctive that his influence lay more in the intensity of his commitment to art itself than in any direct stylistic legacy. RIZZOLI International PUBN, 2009 - 288 sayfa. The British artist developed a way of portraying the human body that was unique in the history of painting-usually in isolation, at moments of extreme tension or even pain, distorted like figures from a fantastical nightmare. He remains a towering example to those dedicated to the depiction of the human figure.

Francis Bacon's style was so personal and distinctive that his influence lay more in the intensity of his commitment to art itself than in any direct stylistic legacy.

This is the catalogue for an exhibition of Bacon’s work held at the Tate gallery in London from September 2008- January 2009, containing essays on his life and art, and illustrated with a multitude of reproductions of his artwork. Condition: The card covers are in near fine condition, clean and fresh, with only mild imperfections. The binding is very tight. The interior is fresh and in fine condition.

Along with J.M.W. Turner, Francis Bacon (1909-92) is widely regarded internationally as Britain's greatest painter. Drawing on low-art sources, including photographs torn from magazines and imagery from films, with a keen awareness of the rich historical tradition of painting stretching back to the renaissance, he developed a way of portraying the human body that was unique in the history of painting. Beginning his public career in 1944 with "Three Studies for Figures at the Base of the Crucifixion", he depicted human beings, usually in isolation, at moments of extreme tension or even pain, distorted like figures from a fantastical nightmare.For many contemporary critics, Bacon's bleakly existential outlook, coupled with his flamboyant homosexuality and colourful private life, made him a controversial figure. Nevertheless, the mastery of the medium of paint by this self-taught artist was recognised relatively early, and in 1962 he had a retrospective exhibition at Tate. In 1985, on the occasion of another exhibition, the then Tate Director remarked that Bacon was surely 'the greatest living painter; no artist in our century has presented the human predicament with such insight and feeling'.Towards the end of the first decade of a new century it is time to re-assess the achievement of this unique artist, whose style was so personal and distinctive that his influence lay more in the intensity of his commitment to art itself than in any direct stylistic legacy. Leading authority on the international avant-grade, Matthew Gale and renowned expert on British art Chris Stephens are joined by other international critics in a radical reassessment of Bacon's importance for the twenty-first century.
Comments: (5)
Golkree
A great book, for the price. The reproductions are good, but most, in my opinion, are on the small size. That could be because they tried to fit full triptych on a left and right page spread. (Bacon loved triptychs, and the consistency of style and image between the three paintings of any such series alone helps to show his amazing skill as a painter.) The collection delivered is outstanding. There are some paintings that are not included in the other survey books I have seen. You can't beat the price compared to what else is out there. Overall I think you get more than what you pay for with this one. The washed out appearance of the dust jacket reflects the original painting portrayed. It actually looks a lot better in person. You will be happy when you open this box.
Voodoogore
Took a longfggg time. Nice quality book. Love bacon!
Otiel
This is the catalogue for the current exhibition held at the Tate gallery in London (the first major retrospective on the artist in England since 1985) and which will later go to the Prado in Madrid and the Met in NYC.

The book starts with six essays that, in a way, sum up everything that has been written or said about Bacon over the past fifty years.

The first, entitled "On the margin of the impossible", attempts to show how Bacon's ambition (which was to finish either "at the National Gallery or in the dustbin") and creative process (towards paintings that are neither abstract nor figurative, but hover between both forms of art to reach a new, deeper reality than that of the mere representational figure)make him difficult to pigeonhole in a classical history of movements in modern art.

The second essay dwells on the artist's critical reception during and after his lifetime and shows how European critics were quick to grasp the importance of the artist whereas Americans were much slower (Bacon's reputation in the US only started to grow in the 1960's, even though the Moma had been the first museum to buy one of his paintings in 1946). Over the years, the names of John Russell, David Sylvester, Michel Leiris, Gilles Deleuze and Michael Peppiatt stand out as major proponents of Bacon's art.

The third essay studies Bacon's paintings as such, emphasizing the problems of interpretation, explaining their sources and stressing the importance of chance in the creative process (what Deleuze and Bacon himself used to call "the accident", a term also present in the art of photography, so important to Bacon).

The fourth essay dwells on the importance of film (whether documentary or fiction)in Bacon's work.

The fifth essay studies the importance of male and physique magazines as inspirational material and, in this respect, draws a comparison between Bacon's and Keith Vaughan's art, both artists (without knowing each other personally)revealing - according to the author of this essay - many common traits (notably in the relationships they had with their respective lovers).

The last essay specifically deals with Bacon's iconography, the sources and references that abound in all his paintings, most of them discovered in his studio at the time of his death and which have prompted a complete reassessment of his work.

After this somewhat cumbersome start comes the catalogue itself, divided into eight themes (like "crucifixion", "portrait", "zone", "crisis", "late", etc)each one gathering a group of paintings around it.

On the whole, this book is sometimes interesting to read (and sometimes less so, especially in the fifth essay which does not add anything to the literature on the artist: comparing somewhat pompously Bacon to a minor British artist whose only real point in common with him was his homosexuality ...)but disappointing as far as the quality of the reproductions is concerned, with very few close-ups of details.

I own more than a dozen books on Bacon and this one qualifies as average, both for the text and the reproductions.
Quemal
the Francis Bacon book edited by Gale and Stephens is full of insights, images and information I didn't know about Francis Bacon. The text is well organized and recommended for the beginning seeking knowledge about Bacon. The Book makes Bacon accessible to non-art historians and enough insider for art groupies.
Landaron
Awesome!