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eBook Man with a Blue Scarf: On Sitting for a Portrait by Lucian Freud download

by Martin Gayford

eBook Man with a Blue Scarf: On Sitting for a Portrait by Lucian Freud download ISBN: 0500289719
Author: Martin Gayford
Publisher: Thames & Hudson; 1 edition (September 9, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 248
ePub: 1661 kb
Fb2: 1387 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: rtf lit lrf mbr
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Martin Gayford creates a portrait of an anarchic painter with views on everything from Leonardo's failings to. .Gayford is taken aback, until the artist explains that every ounce counts when you spend 10 hours a day on your feet darting back and forth before the canvas.

Martin Gayford creates a portrait of an anarchic painter with views on everything from Leonardo's failings to Princess Margaret's voice, writes Laura Cumming. It must indeed take stamina, Gayford reflects, to be a truly great painter like Freud. Whatever else this book may be – a series of biographical close-ups, a volume of table talk, a portrait of the artist painting a portrait – it is essentially a double act, two men stuck together until the sittings are over and Freud lays down his palette.

Martin Gayford is art critic for The Spectator. Lucian Freud died in London in July, 2011, at the age of 88. I knew very little about his work and the little I knew of him was basically that he was a grandson of Sigmund Freud and that he had been married to the writer Caroline Blackwood. While looking into books about Freud, I saw this relatively recently published book by Martin Gayford, telling of his serving as a subject for a Freud portrait. In all, Gayford sat for Freud in his London studio about 16 months as Freud painted his portrait. In all, Gayford sat for Freud in his London studio about 16 months as Freud painted his portrait

Martin Gayford is art critic for The Spectator. His books include Man with a Blue Scarf, A Bigger Message, and Rendez-vouz with Art (with Philippe de Montebello). At the same time Freud was painting Gayford, he had several other on-going portraits he was working on. Well, if Freud could paint, Gayford can write. He compares his own sitting as a subject to the other subjects Freud had worked on over the years. Gayford puts styles to pictures and gives a marvelous overview to Freud's long career.

Man with a Blue Scarf book. Gayford, an art critic, sits for a portrait by Lucian Freud, grandson of Sigmund and a vibrant octogenarian. Freud's paintings are here and beautifully reproduced. In particular, the self-portraits are revealing, perhaps the equal of (dare I say it) a certain Dutch master. There is also a friendship between sitter and painter, which allows Freud to expound on other artists, subjects and the artist's unique worldview. But this is fundamentally a book about two things.

This is the true story of a man called Martin Gayford, art critic by trade, who sat for a portrait by Lucian Freud seven years ago, told by the man who sat for that portrait over hundreds of hours. It is told in the form of a diary, sitting by sitting, easily, conversationally, insightfully, with a delicate humour, often self-deprecating. This is the true story of a man called Martin Gayford, art critic by trade, who sat for a portrait by Lucian Freud seven years ago, told by the man who sat for that portrait over hundreds of hours.

Man With a Blue Scarf is based on diary entries made once each sitting and the subsequent dinner at one of Freud's . Time and memory are important themes. Freud has no clearer idea than Gayford whether the sittings will continue for weeks, months or a year

Man With a Blue Scarf is based on diary entries made once each sitting and the subsequent dinner at one of Freud's favourite London restaurants - eating together being an integral part of the ritual of getting to know his sitters - were finished. Freud has no clearer idea than Gayford whether the sittings will continue for weeks, months or a year. Each painting," he says, "is an exploration into unknown territory.

Art critic Martin Gayford (A Bigger Message: Conversations with David Hockney and Man With a Blue Scarf: On Sitting .

Art critic Martin Gayford (A Bigger Message: Conversations with David Hockney and Man With a Blue Scarf: On Sitting for a Portrait by Lucian Freud) delivers the first annual Weinrebe lecture on Life-Writing and Portraiture. Series: Wolfson College Podcasts. People: Martin Gayford. Oxford Unit: Wolfson College.

Lucian Freud (1922-2011), widely regarded as the greatest figurative painter of our time, spent seven months painting a portrait of the art critic Martin Gayford. The daily narrative of their encounters takes the reader into that most private place, the artist’s studio, and to the heart of the working methods of this modern master-both technical and subtly psychological. From this emerges an understanding of what a portrait is, but something else is also created: a portrait, in words, of Freud himself

Gayford described chronologically, in the acclaimed book Man With a Blue Scarf, sitting for a portrait by Lucian Freud.

Gayford described chronologically, in the acclaimed book Man With a Blue Scarf, sitting for a portrait by Lucian Freud. The book is illustrated throughout with photographs and images and the result vividly conveys what it is like to be on the inside of the process of creating a painting by a great artist. His newest book is A Bigger Message - which chronicles Gayford's conversations with David Hockney over many years and is destined to become another classic.

Lucian was extremely interested in other people, said Martin Gayford, an art critic who knew the artist well and spent 18 months posing for a Freud portrait, later describing the experience in a book ( Man With a Blue Scarf: On Sitting for a Portrait by Lucian Freud ). He wasn’t tremendously wrapped up in his own psychology, Mr. Gayford added. He’d say, ‘I’m not very introspective. What motivated him, rather, was the constant need to change and evolve and not repeat himself, Mr. Gayford said

“An extraordinary record of a great artist in his studio, it also describes what it feels like to be transformed into a work of art.” ―ARTnews

Lucian Freud (1922-2011), widely regarded as the greatest figurative painter of our time, spent seven months painting a portrait of the art critic Martin Gayford. The daily narrative of their encounters takes the reader into that most private place, the artist’s studio, and to the heart of the working methods of this modern master―both technical and subtly psychological. From this emerges an understanding of what a portrait is, but something else is also created: a portrait, in words, of Freud himself. This is not a biography, but a series of close-ups: the artist at work and in conversation at restaurants, in taxis, and in his studio. It takes one into the company of the painter for whom Picasso, Giacometti, and Francis Bacon were friends and contemporaries, as were writers such as George Orwell and W. H. Auden. The book is illustrated with many of Lucian Freud’s other works, telling photographs taken by David Dawson of Freud in his studio, and images by such great artists of the past as van Gogh and Titian who are discussed by Freud and Gayford. Full of wry observations, the book reveals the inside story of how it feels to pose for a remarkable artist and become a work of art. 63 illustrations, 57 in color
Comments: (7)
Ynap
Highly recommend! I really enjoyed this book! It's such an interesting and different point of view. If you love reading about art, if you are interested in Lucien Freud, and if you are interested in the process of making art and what it takes to be a great artist, you should read this book. The quality of the book is also superb! The art work is printed in good color and detail, and everything the author is referring to, every art work, even if it's not by Lucien Freud, is included in the book, the page numbers are given, and the art work is located usually right next to the text or on the next page. Go and get this book, you will enjoy it!
Anardred
British art critic Martin Gayford has written of his posing for the late painter, Lucian Freud, in his book, "Man with a Blue Scarf". Both Gayford's writing and the Freud paintings (as well as others referred to in the text) are brilliant. I found this to be a wonderful introduction both to Freud's work and the actual work on the part of both artist and subject.

Lucian Freud died in London in July, 2011, at the age of 88. I knew very little about his work and the little I knew of him was basically that he was a grandson of Sigmund Freud and that he had been married to the writer Caroline Blackwood. While looking into books about Freud, I saw this relatively recently published book by Martin Gayford, telling of his serving as a subject for a Freud portrait. In all, Gayford sat for Freud in his London studio about 16 months as Freud painted his portrait. At the same time Freud was painting Gayford, he had several other on-going portraits he was working on.

Well, if Freud could paint, Gayford can write. He compares his own sitting as a subject to the other subjects Freud had worked on over the years. Gayford puts styles to pictures and gives a marvelous overview to Freud's long career. In their sittings, Freud and Gayford spent long hours talking about Freud, his career, his life and loves, and his interests in life. While I assume the conversations were two-sided, Gayford recounts the gist of the conversations from Freud's view. And while comparing Freud's work to others, both past and present, who have influenced Freud, the book usually includes pictures of the paintings being written about.

Martin Gayford has written not so much an art book, but more a "memoir" of Lucian Freud and these 16 months spent by artist and subject. It's a marvelous book. (As is the finished portrait, which did not go to Gayford, but rather into a collection of a California couple. Evidently, the subject only poses; the finished painting goes elsewhere.)
salivan
This is a fabulous book whether you like Freud's work or not. ( I don't). But I could not stop reading it. The book is so beautifully written, the language such a pleasure, and it is fascinating to learn about Freud's painting style, and about all the thoughts swirling through the model's mind before, during, and after. I imagine that Anybody with the slightest interest in art, art history or culture in general, would enjoy this book.
Zeleence
Incredible description of each "sitting" session for a portrait. Each session took many hours. Painter and model got to talk far more between them than they did with family or close friends. It became a symbiosis of the minds and presences.
Pemand
A wonderful story about a great artist written by an excellent writer. I can say that anyone who enjoys the art of Freud to purchase this volume and settle down in a comfortable chair, as this is an excellent warm insightful story of a very interesting artist.
Definitely one of the more enjoyable books that I have read in a while. A must if you follow Lucian Freud and want to learn a little bit more of the man and the artist. Most enjoyable.
Hellblade
read this quickly and easily...felt like i was sitting in the same room with both author and artist
Fordg
I hated to see this book end. It felt like I was part of a thoughtful conversation, and I returned to the pages as eagerly as Gayford returned for his appointments with the artist. The sense of Freud's 81 years filled with painting three subjects in a day filled me with hope that I too might retain energy late in life. The observations about work habits, birthday parties, dinners, and the pace of modern life offered insight into one of today's great painters who strives to please no one but himself. The writing was beautifully done, graceful, incisive, and every page pleased. I recommend it most highly!
The title suggests that this book could quite easily have been about the artists sitter, writer Martin Gayford, not Lucian Freud, the artist. However, Martin Gayford is far too good a writer to fall into that trap, and delivers the most fascinating, intelligent and informative book about the challenging art of portraiture, as executed by a genius artist. The reader morphs into the sitter, as Freud dabs, chats, mumbles, stares intensely.....month, after month, after month. This is a classic case of the journey being the destination, and what a brilliant journey it is.

Now I want to see the portrait.