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by Paul R Schimmel,Judith Stein

eBook The Figurative Fifties: New York Figurative Expressionism download ISBN: 0847809420
Author: Paul R Schimmel,Judith Stein
Publisher: Rizzoli; First Edition edition (August 15, 1988)
Language: English
Pages: 195
ePub: 1215 kb
Fb2: 1790 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lit azw txt lrf
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: Collections Catalogs and Exhibitions

According to Paul Schimmel and Judith Stein, curators of The Figurative Fifties (TFF), the 1980s were a fortuitous .

According to Paul Schimmel and Judith Stein, curators of The Figurative Fifties (TFF), the 1980s were a fortuitous time to re-examine the 1950s from a wider lens. TFF was shown at 3 museums from Summer of 1988 to Spring, 1989. In other words, if you are going to truly address the figurative fifties via figurative expressionism, you need to reckon with its meaning and impact as a national phenomenon – an evolving style that was at least ten years old, antecedent to AE’s rise. Among its practitioners were Ben Shahn, Vaclav Vytlacil, Hans Burckhardt, Benton Spruance, Leonard Baskin, and Rico Lebrun, to name only a very few.

Figurative Fifties book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Figurative Fifties: New York Figurative Expressionism as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

New York Figurative Expressionists belong within abstract expressionism, he argued, pointing out they had always taken a. .Paul Schimmel and Judith E Stein, The Figurative fifties : New York figurative expressionism, (Newport Beach, Calif

New York Figurative Expressionists belong within abstract expressionism, he argued, pointing out they had always taken a strong position against an implied protocol, "whether at the Metropolitan Museum or the Artists Club. Early Figurative Expressionists: 1930s–1940s. Paul Schimmel and Judith E Stein, The Figurative fifties : New York figurative expressionism, (Newport Beach, Calif. Newport Harbor Art Museum : New York : Rizzoli, 1988. ISBN 978-0-8478-0942-4.

Soft cover book titled THE FIGURATIVE FIFTIES: New York Figurative Expressionism. With essays by Klaus Kertess, Carter Ratcliff and others. Published by Newport Harbor Art Museum to accompany a 1988 exhibition. See my photographs (6) of this book on main listing page.

Items related to The Figurative Fifties: New York Figurative Expressionism. This well-conceived exhibition catalog is the first to examine exclusively the figurative aspects of New York School painting at the height of Abstract Expressionism

Items related to The Figurative Fifties: New York Figurative Expressionism. Paul R Schimmel; Judith Stein The Figurative Fifties: New York Figurative Expressionism. ISBN 13: 9780847809424. The Figurative Fifties: New York Figurative Expressionism. Paul R Schimmel; Judith Stein. This well-conceived exhibition catalog is the first to examine exclusively the figurative aspects of New York School painting at the height of Abstract Expressionism. Thirteen artists who countered the prevailing abstract mode in favor of the figure are represented in 81 paintings and drawings. Four informative essays elucidate the work's 100 illustrations, 61 in color.

The Figurative Fifties : New York Figurative Expressionism. Publisher Rizzoli International Publications. Publication City/Country New York, United States. By (author) Paul Schimmel, By (author) Judith Stein. AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window). Illustrations note illustrations (some colour).

New York Figurative Expressionism is a visual arts movement and a branch of.Paul Schimmel and Judith E Stein, The Figurative fifties : New York figurative expressionism, (Newport Beach, Calif

New York Figurative Expressionism is a visual arts movement and a branch of American Figurative Expressionism  . Figurative Art during Abstract Expressionism: 1950s.

New York Figurative Expressionism of the 1950s represented a trend where "diverse New York artists countered . Paul Schimmel and Judith E Stein, The Figurative fifties : New York figurative expressionism, Figuring Out the Fifties, (Newport Beach, Calif

New York Figurative Expressionism of the 1950s represented a trend where "diverse New York artists countered the prevailing abstract mode to work with the figure. 1 Categories of figurative expressionist modes. Paul Schimmel and Judith E Stein, The Figurative fifties : New York figurative expressionism, Figuring Out the Fifties, (Newport Beach, Calif. Willem De Kooning; Thomas B. Hess; M. Knoedler & C. De Kooning; recent paintings, (New York, Walker and Company, 1967.

Paul Schimmel and Judith E Stein, The Figurative fifties : New York figurative expressionism, (Newport .

Paul Schimmel and Judith E Stein, The Figurative fifties : New York figurative expressionism, (Newport Beach, Calif. Bram Dijkstra, American expressionism : art and social change, 1920–1950, (New York : . Abrams, in association with the Columbus Museum of Art, 2003. ISBN 978-0-8109-4231-8. Marika Herskovic, American Abstract and Figurative Expressionism Style Is Timely Art Is Timeless (New York School Press, 2009. ISBN 978-677994-2-1. Marika Herskovic, ed.

New York Figurative Expressionism is a visual arts movement and a branch of American Figurative Expressionism. Though the movement dates to the 1930s, it was not formally classified as figurative expressionism until the term arose as a counter-distinction to the New York-based postwar movement known.

Book by Paul R Schimmel, Judith Stein
Comments: (2)
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The definitive survey on a branch of art that has been long overlooked. Some of the artists, like Willem DeKooning have always been at the forefront of discussion; some like Pollock don't really belong here. Then you have painters who, over time, have grown better, like Muller, Thompson, and Porter, but remain underrated. and there are a few who now seem trite. Pictures are many and beautiful; essays are thorough and thoughtful.
Broadraven
The post-WWII 1950s were a vibrant decade in American art, a time when modernist expressions reached greater audiences via popular media and expanding national museums. For the first time, New York became the center of America’s and the world's avant-garde, largely through the works of the NY School and their style of brisk, gestural painting in large formats and known as Abstract Expressionism (AE). So successful was this group and their advocates in the emerging art critical media in staking out primary and high ground, that by the early 1960s abstraction was perceived to be the dominant mode of avant-garde art making, while parallel modernist figurative and representational art ca. 1945 – 1965 was given short shrift and declared passé in influential art circles.

Starting in the late 1970s, however, the overlarge position of AE in postwar art history began to be challenged by a new generation of art historians and cultural critics who were discovering a much wider “bandwidth” of 1950s artistic expressions that (alas) since had come to be ignored or consigned to deep storage in museum collections. Both senior and younger curators simply had stopped caring about this work, virtually assuming that post-WWII art serially evolved from AE to Pop Art, Op Art, Minimal and Conceptual Art. Anything else didn’t really count.

According to Paul Schimmel and Judith Stein, curators of “The Figurative Fifties” (TFF), the 1980s were a fortuitous time to re-examine the 1950s from a wider lens. TFF was shown at 3 museums from Summer of 1988 to Spring, 1989.

The main problem with this exhibition and its catalogue was the curators’ decision to focus on what they categorize as “NY figurative expressionism.” Their reason for doing appears to be the association of TFF’s 13 figurative artists with the NY art scene and their personal acquaintance with the AE artists of the NY AE School.

This is a thin premise for TFF and also misguided. Indeed, there WAS a figurative expressionist tendency in NY art but this also existed in American art as early as the late 1930s, evolving through native expressions that artists adapted from European surrealism and cubism. In other words, if you are going to truly address the figurative fifties via figurative expressionism, you need to reckon with its meaning and impact as a national phenomenon – an evolving style that was at least ten years old, antecedent to AE’s rise. Among its practitioners were Ben Shahn, Vaclav Vytlacil, Hans Burckhardt, Benton Spruance, Leonard Baskin, and Rico Lebrun, to name only a very few. And, of course, you still haven’t heard of most of them, though their oeuvre is strong and they enjoyed solid reputations in their time – that is, until their legacy was unjustly overshadowed by AE and Pop. Their “problem” was that they were not shy of interpreting literary, religious, social and political subjects that the AbEx’ers eschewed in favor of a “pure aesthetic.” (See Bram Djikstra, “American Expressionism: Art and Social Change, 1920 – 1950,” for the origins of figurative expressionism, that went unmentioned in TFF.)

And the NY-centric approach of the curators causes them to force into the figurative expressionist camp NY painters who don’t belong there: Larry Rivers, Alex Katz and Fairfield Porter. In addition, the exhibit includes only one work from Jackson Pollock’s Jungian archetypes, yet overshares with no less than 16 works from Willem de Kooning’s Women series.

Attending to the 4 essays in TFF, only Judith Stein’s is worth reading, as she specifically cites instances of the resistance to figurative-themed work from critics and the second-rate status assigned to the figurative expressionists who in interviews recollect various actual incidents of disregard to the curators. Co-curator Paul Schimmel contributed a short essay on de Kooning’s Women, but it is little more than promotional advocacy and lacks meaningful critical insight.

Besides Stein’s essay the only other positive features of TFF are the 100 illustrations of seldom seen works -- 61 of which are in color, a lengthy select bibliography (did any of the writers make use of it?), and exhibit histories for each artist from 1950 to 1965, the period when they received the most attention for their work. The short biographies of the 13 artists are by different writers and thus range widely from subjective puffery, to mystification, to a few with some genuine critical insight, e.g. Helen Harrison on Larry Rivers; Brian O’ Doherty on Fairfield Porter – but again, neither were figurative expressionists.