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by Brendan M. Lee,DaeWha Kang,Justin Kwok,Robert McClure

eBook Perspecta 37 Famous: The Yale Architectural Journal (No. 37) download ISBN: 0262612054
Author: Brendan M. Lee,DaeWha Kang,Justin Kwok,Robert McClure
Publisher: The MIT Press (February 1, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 160
ePub: 1441 kb
Fb2: 1388 kb
Rating: 4.5
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Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: Architecture

by Brendan M. Lee (Author), DaeWha Kang (Author), Justin Kwok . Brendan Lee is a graduate of the Yale School of Architecture and a practicing architect. Series: Perspecta (Book 37).

by Brendan M. Lee (Author), DaeWha Kang (Author), Justin Kwok (Author), Robert McClure (Author) & 1 more. ISBN-13: 978-0262612050.

Perspecta 37 famous book. Start by marking Perspecta 37 "famous": The Yale Architectural Journal as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Perspecta 37 "Famous". The Yale Architectural Journal. Justin Kwok is a graduate of the Yale School of Architecture and a practicing architect. This issue of Perspecta discusses whether fame empowers architecture by giving architects leverage to produce ambitious projects or undermines architecture by diluting the quality and neglecting the values it must serve. Robert McClure is a graduate of the Yale School of Architecture and a practicing architect.

Brendan Lee is a graduate of the Yale School of Architecture and a practicing architect.

The Yale Architectural Journal. Brendan Lee, DaeWha Kang, Justin Kwok, and Robert McClure 2005

The Yale Architectural Journal. Brendan Lee, DaeWha Kang, Justin Kwok, and Robert McClure 2005. Does this serve architecture or only the architectural star? The contributors to Perspecta examine both sides of the argument: Architecture moves forward through a process of innovation; fame provides the architect with the leverage needed to accomplish innovation.

Perspecta 37 Famous : The Yale Architectural Journal (No. 37) [Brendan M. Lee, DaeWha Kang, Justin Kwok, Robert . Perspecta 44: The Yale Architectural Journal. Book Chapter Tomlin, . Speaking of geodesign.

Perspecta 44: The Yale Architectural Journal.

Find nearly any book by DaeWha Kang. by Brendan M. Lee, DaeWha Kang, Justin Kwok, Robert McClure. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9780262612050 (978-0-262-61205-0) Softcover, The MIT Press, 2006. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. com has become a leading book price comparison site

Mit Press, 9780262612050, 175pp. Publication Date: November 1, 2005. Does fame empower architecture or undermine it? Does the star power or cult status of an architect enhance the art or dilute it?

This issue of Perspecta discusses whether fame empowers architecture by giving architects leverage to produce ambitious projects or undermines architecture by diluting the quality and neglecting the values it must serve.

Does fame empower architecture or undermine it? Does the star power or cult status of an architect enhance the art or dilute it? This issue of Perspecta―the oldest and most distinguished student-edited, university-based American architecture journal―examines the inner workings of fame as it relates to architecture though media and culture. It looks at how the commodification of architecture affects the design process―whether fame emphasizes all the wrong aspects of architecture or provides the only way an architect can produce truly ambitious projects. How does architecture generate fame? And how does fame generate architecture? Celebrity permeates all levels of contemporary society; architecture, academia, the architectural press, and the mainstream media all play a role in promoting the mystique of the designer genius. The tradition of learning through apprenticeship and the struggle to have projects commissioned and built perpetuate the importance of the famous architect. Does this serve architecture or only the architectural star? The contributors to Perspecta examine both sides of the argument: Architecture moves forward through a process of innovation; fame provides the architect with the leverage needed to accomplish innovation. Or is it that fame, because of its relationship to the media and popular tastes, inevitably dilutes the quality of the architecture? Does "famous" architecture glorify only itself and neglect the people, the values, and the functions that it must serve?