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by George Hersey

eBook Architecture, Poetry, and Number in the Royal Palace at Caserta download ISBN: 0262081210
Author: George Hersey
Publisher: The MIT Press; First Edition edition (May 20, 1983)
Language: English
Pages: 384
ePub: 1221 kb
Fb2: 1992 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: docx lit doc mobi
Category: Art and Photo
Subcategory: Architecture

Caserta is by far the largest royal palace in the world in terms of volume, with more than 2 million m³ (70 million . Architecture, Poetry, and Number in the Royal Palace at Caserta, (Cambridge: MIT Press) 1983.

Caserta is by far the largest royal palace in the world in terms of volume, with more than 2 million m³ (70 million cu ft). Behind the façades of its matching segmental ranges of outbuildings that flank the giant forecourt, a jumble of buildings arose to facilitate daily business  . Caserta interpreted through the Neapolitan philosopher Giambattista Vico.

The great palace of Caserta, near Naples, probably the largest building . George Hersey is Emeritus Professor of Art History at Yale University.

The great palace of Caserta, near Naples, probably the largest building erected in Europe in the eighteenth century, became an archetypal expression of absolute monarchy. It was begun in 1752 for Carlo di Borbone, King of the Two Sicilies, who worked closely with its chief architect, Luigi Vanvitelli. Architecture, Poetry, and Number in the Royal Palace at Caserta. Although Vanvitelli was one of the most notable architects of his The great palace of Caserta, near Naples, probably the largest building erected in Europe in the eighteenth century, became an archetypal expression of absolute monarchy

The great palace of Caserta, near Naples, probably the largest building erected in Europe in the eighteenth century, became an archetypal expression of absolute monarchy.

The great palace of Caserta, near Naples, probably the largest building erected in Europe in the eighteenth century, became an archetypal expression of absolute monarchy

The great palace of Caserta, near Naples, probably the largest building erected in Europe in the eighteenth century, became an archetypal expression of absolute monarchy.

European Architecture. Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians Vol. 43 No. 3, Oc. 1984 (pp. 269-270) DOI: 1. 307/990011. Find this author on Google Scholar.

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The palace was built in Caserta because the king was very fascinated by the beauty of the Caserta landscape and, for security reasons . In the 1997 the Royal Palace of Caserta has been declared World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

The palace was built in Caserta because the king was very fascinated by the beauty of the Caserta landscape and, for security reasons, he wanted it far from the sea and inland, but not far from Naples. The Palace would have to stand comparison with that of Versailles. The Palace was completed in 1845 (although it was already inhabited by 1780) and is considered the last great example of Italian Baroque. 1 The history of the Royal Palace of Caserta. 2 The Royal Palace of Caserta, the structure and the Park.

George Hersey, "Architecture, Poetry, and Number in the Royal Palace at Caserta", (Cambridge: MIT Press) 1983. Look at other dictionaries

Download PDF book format. Dewey Decimal Classification Number: 72. /2/0945725 19. Personal Name: Hersey, George L.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Architecture, poetry, and number in the royal palace at Caserta George L. Hersey. Book's title: Architecture, poetry, and number in the royal palace at Caserta George L. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0262081210. System Control Number: (OCoLC)ocm08930631. Publication, Distribution, et. Cambridge, Mass.

The great palace of Caserta, near Naples, probably the largest building erected in Europe in the eighteenth century, became an archetypal expression of absolute monarchy. It was begun in 1752 for Carlo di Borbone, King of the Two Sicilies, who worked closely with its chief architect, Luigi Vanvitelli. Although Vanvitelli was one of the most notable architects of his century, as Caserta was one of its major buildings, this study by a leading scholar of Baroque and Neapolitan architecture is the first book in English on the architect and his masterpiece. The book offers a new view of the palatial and megapalatial in architecture. Although the monarch for whom it was built never spent a night under its roof, Caserta was designed to provide the royal family and the court with a grand residence and more. It was also intended to house the offices of the government bureaucracy, barracks, a national library, a university, and a national theater - not only to symbolize but to contain the organs of a large modern state. Caserta influenced much that came after: plans by Boullée for a new Versailles to return pride of size to France, buildings in both Imperial and Soviet Russia, palaces of the later British Empire, even the Pentagon. As Hersey notes, "if Carlo di Borbone could return from the grave and rule the United States, he would move the seat of executive power from the White House to the Pentagon." The book also provides intriguing insights into the relationships between poetry - painted and sculptured allegories - and number - architectural planning that has become a geometrical game. It sketches the intellectual background of Carlo's conception, emphasizing the king's mythical forebears and his love of mathematical order. It shows that the Neapolitan poet and philosopher, Giambattista Vico, influenced the king to incorporate such mythic figures as Hercules and Aeneas into his genealogy and Vanvitelli to introduce their likenesses into Caserta's art, which is in turn integrated with the geometry of the palace's gardens and the numerical sequences of its rooms. George L. Hersey is Professor of Art History at Yale.
Comments: (2)
Unereel
Very interlectural.
Ucantia
Wonderful book! Everything you've wanted to know about the Royal Palace at Caserta and much, much more.