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eBook Russian Law:The End of the Soviet System and the Role of Law (Law in Eastern Europe) download

by Ferdinand Feldbrugge

eBook Russian Law:The End of the Soviet System and the Role of Law (Law in Eastern Europe) download ISBN: 0792323580
Author: Ferdinand Feldbrugge
Publisher: Springer; 1993 edition (June 17, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 498
ePub: 1842 kb
Fb2: 1110 kb
Rating: 4.7
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Category: Act
Subcategory: Legal Theory and Systems

The book has been written for legal practitioners, comparative lawyers, and students of Russian law, but will also be of interest to a wider audience of political scientists . Soviet Law and the Soviet State From 1917 to Brezhnev. 86. From the USSR to the Commonwealth.

The book has been written for legal practitioners, comparative lawyers, and students of Russian law, but will also be of interest to a wider audience of political scientists, journalists, etc. Mostra el llibre . Què opinen els usuaris - Escriviu una ressenya. No hem trobat cap ressenya als llocs habituals. Pàgines seleccionades. 103. The Central State Agencies of the Soviet Union. 143. The Organization of the Russian State.

1993 (No. 45 in Law in Eastern Europe series, F. J. M. Feldbrugge, e. Quinnipiac College School of Law and The George Washington University.

J. Feldbrugge, Russian Law: The End of the Soviet System and the Role of Law, Dordrecht, Boston, London: Martinus Nijhoff, 1993 (No. Albert J. Schmidt (a1). F.

by Ferdinand Feldbrugge. Published June 17, 1993 by Springer. There's no description for this book yet.

This is the first treatise on Russia's new legal system, as it emerged from the dissolution of the Soviet Union

Ferdinand Feldbrugge is Professor Emeritus for East European Law at Leiden University.

Ferdinand Feldbrugge is Professor Emeritus for East European Law at Leiden University. Библиографические данные.

Soviet law, law developed in Russia after the communist seizure of power . The liberalization of the Soviet economy and political system by Mikhail Gorbachev in the mid-1980s undermined some of the basic.

Soviet law, law developed in Russia after the communist seizure of power in 1917 and imposed throughout the Soviet Union in the 1920s. Soviet law developed a new role as an instrument for the implementation of party policy and national economic planning. The liberalization of the Soviet economy and political system by Mikhail Gorbachev in the mid-1980s undermined some of the basic elements of the Soviet legal system. The use of false criminal charges and psychiatric diagnoses to control dissidents was largely halted; partially free elections and some free speech were allowed; and private businesses were legalized.

Law in Eastern Europe A series published in cooperation with the Institute of East European Law and Russian Studies of Leiden University, the Universities of Trento and Graz and the European Academy of Bozen/Bolzano. VOLUME 60. Private and Civil Law in the Russian Federation Essays in Honor of . This book is printed on acid-free paper.

The role of top-down harmonisation of national law with European directives, the conflicts between academic and political as well as between material and symbolic interests in the drafting process are discussed. The chapter also identifies how mechanisms of legal transplantation, legal technical assistance, regulatory competition and legal emulation impact on the structure and substance of new codes in the region.

Law in Medieval Russia. By. Ferdinand Feldbrugge. Foreword Soviet law, and then Russian law, have been the central themes in my work for most of my professional life. But, from the start of my career, I have entertained a lively interest in legal history, especially in that particular form where the field is studied for its own sake and not as a handmaiden for legal practice. xii. Law in Medieval Russia.

This is the first treatise on Russia's new legal system, as it emerged from the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The first part of the book analyses in detail the political and economic origins of perestroika, indispensable for understanding the basic parameters of the evolution of Russian law. In the following chapters all major legal subjects are discussed against the background of their Soviet past and as the result of the radical changes in the political, social and economic make-up of the country. The appendices include the texts of the U.S.S.R. and Russian Constitutions, the Agreement of Minsk, The Russian Federation Treaty, bibliographical sources, and extensive indices of Soviet and Russian legislation.The book has been written for legal practitioners, comparative lawyers, and students of Russian law, but will also be of interest to a wider audience of political scientists, journalists, etc.