carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Slavery, Law Society in the British Windward Islands 1763-1823: A Comparative Study

eBook Slavery, Law Society in the British Windward Islands 1763-1823: A Comparative Study download

by Bernard Marshall,Arawak publications,Annika Lewinson-Morgan (cover)

eBook Slavery, Law  Society in the British Windward Islands 1763-1823: A Comparative Study download ISBN: 9768189274
Author: Bernard Marshall,Arawak publications,Annika Lewinson-Morgan (cover)
Publisher: Arawak publications; 1st edition (March 19, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 302
ePub: 1298 kb
Fb2: 1435 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: rtf lrf lrf lit
Category: Act
Subcategory: Legal Theory and Systems

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Not the book you’re looking for?

Details (if other): Cancel. Slavery, Law & Society In The British Windward Islands : A Comparative Study. by. Bernard Marshall.

Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author.

Slavery, Law & Society In The British Windward Islands : A Comparative Study. Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. Is this you? Let us know.

Publisher Arawak Publications. Publication City/Country United States. ISBN13 9789768189271.

Slavery Law and Society in the British Windward Islands 1763-1823 : A comparative Study. Publisher:Arawak Publications. Select Format: Hardcover. 80 lbs. Age Range:17 years and up. Related Subjects. History Political Science Politics & Social Sciences Science & Math Social Science Social Sciences.

Windward of the Law by Mackey, Rex and a great selection of related . Book of humorous and/or appalling Irish law history and anecdotes. Slavery, Law & Society in the British Windward Islands 1763-1823: a Comparative Study.

Book of humorous and/or appalling Irish law history and anecdotes. Seller Inventory 000603. Published by Arawak publications (2007).

The book entitled, Slavery, Law and Society in the British Windward Islands 1763. Even though this is a local case study, it is an important contribution to the history of slavery in the Caribbean and in the New World in general. Bernard crafted this piece of work by pooling both original documents and contemporary secondary sources at repositories in England to aid in the completion of this expose. Bernard provides irresistible evidence of how the law, far from being an impartial judge of justice, was a tool used by the ruling class to perpetuate the hegemony of the exploitative colonial plantation system and to entrench inequitable power relations in the Caribbean.

Slavery and the Enlightenment in the British Atlantic, 1750–1807. London: W. Nicol, 1831.

Law and Society in the British Windward Islands, 1763–1823: A Comparative Study. Kingston, Jamaica: Arawak Publications, 2007. British Historical Statistics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988. Slavery and the British Empire: From Africa to America. Slavery and the Enlightenment in the British Atlantic, 1750–1807. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Sheridan, Richard B. Simon Taylor, Sugar Tycoon of Jamaica, 1740–1813. Agricultural History 45 (1971): 285–296.

Bernard Marshall has written: 'Slavery, Law & Society in the British Windward Islands 1763-1823'. Bernard C. Cairns has written: 'Australian civil procedure' - subject(s): Civil procedure 'The law of discovery in Australia' - subject(s): Discovery (Law).

The book entitled, Slavery, Law and Society in the British Windward .

The book entitled, Slavery, Law and Society in the British Windward Islands 1763-1823, a Comparative Study by Bernard Marshall analyses and examines the extent to which these territories were captivated by using the law to protect the rich white minority while simultaneously exploiting and degrading the black majority of the population of the British Windward Islands. Nonetheless, this was not so in the British Windward Islands throughout the period 1763 to 1823 as Bernard highlighted in his work.

Drawing on both original documents and contemporary secondary sources at repositories in England and Jamaica, Marshall analyses the economic, social, political and legal framework which bound the lives of the enslaved black populations, free coloureds and whites in St Vincent, Tobago, Dominica and Grenada and the Grenadines in a significant period of Caribbean history. Focusing on the period 1763 to 1823, Marshall weaves together the history of these Windward Islands to build our understanding of their place in imperial competition for wealth and power between the French and the British. He analyses the social texture of their populations and the relationships within and among the different groups and he discusses the nature of resistance of the enslaved population, particularly the Maroons of Dominica. His work provides compelling evidence of how the Law, far from being an impartial arbiter of justice, was a weapon used by the ruling classes to perpetuate the hegemony of the exploitative colonial plantation system and to entrench inequitable power relations in the Caribbean. The literature on slavery in the Caribbean has grown significantly in recent years The contribution of historians, anthropologists, economists, sociologists and legal scholars is indicative of the extent to which the subject has become interdisciplinary. However, despite scattered publications by this writer and others on slavery in Dominica, St. Vincent, Tobago Grenada and the Grenadines, and the rare monograph touching aspects of slavery or a particular group in slave society in an individual island, these communities have been virtually ignored. No single comprehensive work exists on these territories to date. This book is the first attempt to analyse the nature of the slave society in these four communities during sixty critical years of slavery in the Caribbean. It straddles the disciplines of history sociology law and political science. It examines the economic, political, social, religious and legal organisation of society against a background of incipient economic decline and shows how it was affected by total dependence upon the institution of negro slavery. Though a local case study, the book is nevertheless an important contribution to the history of slavery in the Caribbean and in the New World in general. It indicates that Law represented the interest of a specific segment of the population the white minority. Law operated as an instrument of oppression, brutality, barbarism and dehumanisation of the African Caribbean majority as the minority, ruling class fashioned its own brand of social engineering to support a system of racial inequality and exploitation. By bringing to life aspects of the realities of slave society in the Windward Islands, this work helps to fill a gap in an under-researched area of Caribbean history even as it provides a comparative analysis of other areas of the British colonized Caribbean.