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by Randall McGowen,Michael Meranze,David Garland

eBook America's Death Penalty: Between Past and Present download ISBN: 0814732674
Author: Randall McGowen,Michael Meranze,David Garland
Publisher: NYU Press (January 25, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 241
ePub: 1378 kb
Fb2: 1155 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf mbr mbr rtf
Category: Act
Subcategory: Criminal Law

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America's Death Penalty:. If I were asked to recommend a single book that puts the vexed and emotionally charged question of the death penalty into an intelligible historical and contemporary political perspective it would be this one. The introduction sets the stage beautifully and the essays that follow allow readers to come at the problem from a variety of mutually reinforcing perspectives.

America's Death Penalty takes a different approach to the issue by examining the historical and theoretical assumptions that . Contributors: David Garland, Douglas Hay, Randall McGowen, Michael Meranze, Rebecca McLennan, and Jonathan Simon.

At various times the death penalty has been portrayed as an anachronism, an inheritance, or an innovation, with little reflection on the consequences that flow from the choice of words.

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Over the past three decades, the United States has embraced the death penalty with tenacious enthusiasm.

The authors of America’s Death Penalty: Between Past and Present . eventually has been abolished. Historian Michael Meranze then draws upon the writings of Michel.

The authors of America’s Death Penalty: Between Past and Present, however, argue that the death penalty should not be understood in terms of a simple abolitionist/. retentionist dichotomy; rather, they claim, the history of the death penalty is a complex and nuanced. Sociologist David Garland argues that around the world, the death penalty has followed. Foucault, employing Foucault’s concept of the ‘‘biopolitical’’ to understand the rationalities at work.

Professor of Law and Professor of Sociology David Garland; Randall McGowen; Michael Meranze. Professor of Law and Professor of Sociology David Garland; Randall McGowen; Michael Meranze.

America's Death Penalty: Between Past and Present. David Garland, Randall McGowen, Michael Meranze

America's Death Penalty: Between Past and Present. David Garland, Randall McGowen, Michael Meranze. Published by: NYU Press. It is a model for intellectually rigorous scholarship.

Meranze, Michael, Randall McGowen, and David Garland. America 's Death Penalty : Between Past And Present. New York: NYU Press, 2011. eBook Academic Collection (EBSCOhost). UCLA History Professor Michael Meranze, University of Oregon History Professor Randall McGowen, and Professor of Sociology and Law at New York University David Garland explore America’s obsession with the death penalty, from political and religious moral point of views, throughout time.

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Over the past three decades, the United States has embraced the death penalty with tenacious enthusiasm. While most of those countries whose legal systems and cultures are normally compared to the United States have abolished capital punishment, the United States continues to employ this ultimate tool of punishment. The death penalty has achieved an unparalleled prominence in our public life and left an indelible imprint on our politics and culture. It has also provoked intense scholarly debate, much of it devoted to explaining the roots of American exceptionalism.

America’s Death Penalty takes a different approach to the issue by examining the historical and theoretical assumptions that have underpinned the discussion of capital punishment in the United States today. At various times the death penalty has been portrayed as an anachronism, an inheritance, or an innovation, with little reflection on the consequences that flow from the choice of words. This volume represents an effort to restore the sense of capital punishment as a question caught up in history. Edited by leading scholars of crime and justice, these original essays pursue different strategies for unsettling the usual terms of the debate. In particular, the authors use comparative and historical investigations of both Europe and America in order to cast fresh light on familiar questions about the meaning of capital punishment. This volume is essential reading for understanding the death penalty in America.

Contributors: David Garland, Douglas Hay, Randall McGowen, Michael Meranze, Rebecca McLennan, and Jonathan Simon.